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Fatigue in payment diaries - empirical evidence from Germany

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  • Schmidt, Tobias

Abstract

In this paper we analyse whether the recording behaviour of consumers keeping a payment diary changes over the diary period. Using data from a large study on the payment behaviour of German consumers we find that individuals tend to report a higher number of transactions on the first day of the diary period than on subsequent days. Contrary to existing literature we also find that the number of small cash payments recorded does not decrease during the one-week diary period. Our findings indicate that short diaries may be enough to reflect adequately the payment behaviour of all consumers. However, the precision of the estimates increases with longer diaries, at small additional costs. Longer diaries are especially helpful when it comes to analysing subgroups of payment types or rare events.

Suggested Citation

  • Schmidt, Tobias, 2011. "Fatigue in payment diaries - empirical evidence from Germany," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2011,11, Deutsche Bundesbank.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:bubdp1:201111
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Arango & Angelika Welte, 2012. "The Bank of Canada’s 2009 Methods-of-Payment Survey: Methodology and Key Results," Discussion Papers 12-6, Bank of Canada.
    2. Nicole Jonker & Anneke Kosse & Lola Hernández, 2012. "Cash usage in the Netherlands: How much, where, when, who and whenever one wants?," DNB Occasional Studies 1002, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    3. Jonker, Nicole & Hernandez, Lola & de Vree, Renate & Zwaan, Patricia, 2017. "From cash to cards: how debit card payments overtook cash in the Netherlands," International Cash Conference 2017 – War on Cash: Is there a Future for Cash? 168371, Deutsche Bundesbank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    payment behaviour; survey design; diary studies;

    JEL classification:

    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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