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Labor Unions, Unemployment, and Inequality in an OLG-Model with Heterogeneous Agents

As a consequence of falling relative demand for low skilled labor in the OECD, people with no or minor qualification experience a deterioration of their economic situation. While flexible labor markets have led to higher wage differentials in the USA, the major problem of most European countries is the high rate of unemployment of the low skilled. To integrate currently discussed determinants of wage distribution and unemployment into a common context, labor unions and qualification differences in labor supply are introduced to an OLG-model with heterogeneous agents. The model generates skill specific unemployment rates and a wage dispersion affected by production technology, wage setting procedure, and qualification structure of labor supply. As an application of the model, the relative importance of wage dispersion, unemployment, and lifelong learning for economic growth and income distribution can be evaluated.

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File URL: http://www.wiwi.uni-augsburg.de/vwl/institut/paper/207.pdf
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Paper provided by Universitaet Augsburg, Institute for Economics in its series Discussion Paper Series with number 207.

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Length: pages
Date of creation: Sep 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:aug:augsbe:0207
Contact details of provider: Postal: Universitaetsstrasse 16, D-86159 Augsburg, Germany
Phone: +49 821 598 4060
Fax: +49 821 598 4217
Web page: http://www.wiwi.uni-augsburg.de/vwl/institut
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  1. James J. Heckman & Lance Lochner & Christopher Taber, 1998. "Explaining Rising Wage Inequality: Explorations with a Dynamic General Equilibrium Model of Labor Earnings with Heterogeneous Agents," NBER Working Papers 6384, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jaume Ventura & Francesco Caselli, 2000. "A Representative Consumer Theory of Distribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 909-926, September.
  3. Richard Layard & Stephen Nickell, 1998. "Labour Market Institutions and Economic Performance," CEP Discussion Papers dp0407, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 1994. "International Differences in Male Wage Inequality: Institutions versus Market Forces," NBER Working Papers 4678, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Richard B. Freeman & Ronald Schettkat, 1999. "The Role of Wage and Skill Differences in US-German Employment Differences," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 219(1+2), pages 49-66, July.
  6. Imrohoroglu, Ayse & Imrohoroglu, Selahattin & Joines, Douglas H, 1995. "A Life Cycle Analysis of Social Security," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 83-114, June.
  7. Lauer, Charlotte & Steiner, Viktor, 2000. "Returns to education in West Germany: an empirical assessment," ZEW Discussion Papers 00-04, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  8. Vincenzo Quadrini & José-Víctor Ríos-Rull, 1997. "Understanding the U.S. distribution of wealth," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Spr, pages 22-36.
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