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Dynamical Models of Stock Prices Based on Technical Trading Rules Part I: The Models

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  • Li-Xin Wang

Abstract

In this paper we use fuzzy systems theory to convert the technical trading rules commonly used by stock practitioners into excess demand functions which are then used to drive the price dynamics. The technical trading rules are recorded in natural languages where fuzzy words and vague expressions abound. In Part I of this paper, we will show the details of how to transform the technical trading heuristics into nonlinear dynamic equations. First, we define fuzzy sets to represent the fuzzy terms in the technical trading rules; second, we translate each technical trading heuristic into a group of fuzzy IF-THEN rules; third, we combine the fuzzy IF-THEN rules in a group into a fuzzy system; and finally, the linear combination of these fuzzy systems is used as the excess demand function in the price dynamic equation. We transform a wide variety of technical trading rules into fuzzy systems, including moving average rules, support and resistance rules, trend line rules, big buyer, big seller and manipulator rules, band and stop rules, and volume and relative strength rules. Simulation results show that the price dynamics driven by these technical trading rules are complex and chaotic, and some common phenomena in real stock prices such as jumps, trending and self-fulfilling appear naturally.

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  • Li-Xin Wang, 2014. "Dynamical Models of Stock Prices Based on Technical Trading Rules Part I: The Models," Papers 1401.1888, arXiv.org, revised Feb 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1401.1888
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Menkhoff, Lukas, 2010. "The use of technical analysis by fund managers: International evidence," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 2573-2586, November.
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    3. Andrew W. Lo & Harry Mamaysky & Jiang Wang, 2000. "Foundations of Technical Analysis: Computational Algorithms, Statistical Inference, and Empirical Implementation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(4), pages 1705-1770, August.
    4. Ryan Sullivan & Allan Timmermann & Halbert White, 1999. "Data-Snooping, Technical Trading Rule Performance, and the Bootstrap," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(5), pages 1647-1691, October.
    5. Merton, Robert C., 1976. "Option pricing when underlying stock returns are discontinuous," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1-2), pages 125-144.
    6. Gencay, Ramazan, 1998. "The predictability of security returns with simple technical trading rules," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 347-359, October.
    7. Fama, Eugene F, 1970. "Efficient Capital Markets: A Review of Theory and Empirical Work," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 25(2), pages 383-417, May.
    8. Bollerslev, Tim & Chou, Ray Y. & Kroner, Kenneth F., 1992. "ARCH modeling in finance : A review of the theory and empirical evidence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1-2), pages 5-59.
    9. Jegadeesh, Narasimhan & Titman, Sheridan, 1993. " Returns to Buying Winners and Selling Losers: Implications for Stock Market Efficiency," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(1), pages 65-91, March.
    10. Brock, William & Lakonishok, Josef & LeBaron, Blake, 1992. " Simple Technical Trading Rules and the Stochastic Properties of Stock Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(5), pages 1731-1764, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Li-Xin Wang, 2014. "Gaussian-Chain Filters for Heavy-Tailed Noise with Application to Detecting Big Buyers and Big Sellers in Stock Market," Papers 1405.2220, arXiv.org.

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