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Parental Paternalism and Patience

Author

Listed:
  • Lukas Kiessling

    (Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods)

  • Shyamal Chowdhury

    (University of Sydney and IZA)

  • Hannah Schildberg-Hörisch

    (Institute for Competition Economics (DICE) and IZA)

  • Matthias Sutter

    (Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods, University of Cologne, University of Innsbruck, IZA, and CESifo)

Abstract

We study whether and how parents interfere paternalistically in their children’s intertemporal decision-making. Based on experiments with over 2,000 members of 610 families, we find that parents anticipate their children’s present bias and aim to mitigate it. Using a novel method to measure parental interference, we show that more than half of all parents are willing to pay money to override their children’s choices. Parental interference predicts more intensive parenting styles and a lower intergenerational transmission of patience. The latter is driven by interfering parents not transmitting their own present bias, but molding their children’s preferences towards more time-consistent choices.

Suggested Citation

  • Lukas Kiessling & Shyamal Chowdhury & Hannah Schildberg-Hörisch & Matthias Sutter, 2021. "Parental Paternalism and Patience," ECONtribute Discussion Papers Series 055, University of Bonn and University of Cologne, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:ajk:ajkdps:055
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Dahmann, Sarah C. & Kamhöfer, Daniel A. & Schildberg-Hörisch, Hannah, 2022. "The Predictive Power of Self-Control for Life Outcomes," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 197(C), pages 725-744.
    2. Kiessling, Lukas, 2021. "How do parents perceive the returns to parenting styles and neighborhoods?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 139(C).
    3. Jonas Tungodden & Alexander Willén & Alexander L.P. Willén, 2022. "When Parents Decide: Gender Differences in Competitiveness," CESifo Working Paper Series 9516, CESifo.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Parental paternalism; Time preferences; Convex time budgets; Present bias; Intergenerational transmission; Parenting styles; Experiment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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