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“Horn Of Plenty” Revisited: The Globalization Of Mediterranean Horticulture And The Economic Development Of Spain, 1850-1935

  • Vicente Pinilla

    ()

    (Department of Applied Economics and Economic History, University of Zaragoza)

  • María Isabel Ayuda

    ()

    (Department of Economic Analysis, University of Zaragoza)

This paper analizes the impact of the globalization of Mediterranean horticultural products (MHP). From 1850 onwards, the Mediterranean countries took advantage of the new opportunities that arose to increase their production and trade in MHP. The Spanish case shows how the high elasticity of supply with respect to prices helps to explain the enormous increase of its production and trade in MHP, that became the most dynamic sector of Spanish agriculture. The analysis of the counterfactual case of the non-existence of US MHP emphasizes the cost of this increasing competition to the traditional producers from the end of the nineteenth century.

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Paper provided by Asociación Española de Historia Económica in its series Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) with number 0606.

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Length: 49 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ahe:dtaehe:0606
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  1. Stephen Redding & Anthony Venables, 2004. "Geography and Export Performance: External Market Access and Internal Supply Capacity," NBER Chapters, in: Challenges to Globalization: Analyzing the Economics, pages 95-130 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  9. Venables, Anthony J. & Limao, Nuno, 1999. "Geographical disadvantage - a Heckscher-Ohlin-von Thunen model of international specialization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2256, The World Bank.
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