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Major Uses of Land in The United States, 2002

Author

Listed:
  • Lubowski, Ruben N.
  • Vesterby, Marlow
  • Bucholtz, Shawn
  • Baez, Alba
  • Roberts, Michael J.

Abstract

This publication presents the results of the latest (2002) inventory of U.S. major land uses, drawing on data from the Census, public land management and conservation agencies, and other sources. The data are synthesized by State to calculate the use of several broad classes and subclasses of agricultural and nonagricultural land over time. The United States has a total land area of nearly 2.3 billion acres. Major uses in 2002 were forest-use land, 651 million acres (28.8 percent); grassland pasture and range land, 587 million acres (25.9 percent); cropland, 442 million acres (19.5 percent); special uses (primarily parks and wildlife areas), 297 million acres (13.1 percent); miscellaneous other uses, 228 million acres (10.1 percent); and urban land, 60 million acres (2.6 percent). National and regional trends in land use are discussed in comparison with earlier major land-use estimates.

Suggested Citation

  • Lubowski, Ruben N. & Vesterby, Marlow & Bucholtz, Shawn & Baez, Alba & Roberts, Michael J., 2006. "Major Uses of Land in The United States, 2002," Economic Information Bulletin 7203, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersib:7203
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/7203
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ruben N. Lubowski & Andrew J. Plantinga & Robert N. Stavins, 2008. "What Drives Land-Use Change in the United States? A National Analysis of Landowner Decisions," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 84(4), pages 529-550.
    2. Bills, Nelson L., 2007. "Fifty Years of Farmland Protection Legislation in the Northeast: Persistent Issues and Emergent Research Opportunities," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 36(2), October.
    3. Feng Song & Jinhua Zhao & Scott M. Swinton, 2011. "Switching to Perennial Energy Crops Under Uncertainty and Costly Reversibility," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(3), pages 764-779.
    4. Stephen P. Holland & Jonathan E. Hughes & Christopher R. Knittel & Nathan C. Parker, 2013. "Unintended Consequences of Transportation Carbon Policies: Land-Use, Emissions, and Innovation," NBER Working Papers 19636, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Ghimire, Ramesh & Ferreira, Susana & Green, Gary T. & Poudyal, Neelam C. & Cordell, H. Ken & Thapa, Janani R., 2017. "Green Space and Adult Obesity in the United States," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 201-212.
    6. Chamblee, John F. & Dehring, Carolyn A. & Depken, Craig A., 2009. "Watershed development restrictions and land prices: Empirical evidence from southern Appalachia," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 287-296, May.
    7. John F. Chamblee & Peter F. Colwell & Carolyn A. Dehring & Craig A. Depken, 2011. "The Effect of Conservation Activity on Surrounding Land Prices," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(3), pages 453-472.

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