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Productivity Growth in U.S. Agriculture

Author

Listed:
  • Fuglie, Keith O.
  • MacDonald, James C.
  • Ball, V. Eldon

Abstract

Innovation and changes in technology have been a driving force for gains in productivity growth in U.S. agriculture. USDA's Economic Research Service has developed annual indexes of agricultural inputs, outputs, and total factor productivity (TFP) for 1948 through 2004. American agriculture relies almost entirely on productivity growth to raise output. By lowering the cost of agricultural commodities, productivity growth benefits not only farmers but also food manufacturers and consumers.

Suggested Citation

  • Fuglie, Keith O. & MacDonald, James C. & Ball, V. Eldon, 2007. "Productivity Growth in U.S. Agriculture," Economic Brief 6382, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uerseb:6382
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mugera, Amin W. & Langemeier, Michael R., 2008. "Labor Productivity Growth And Convergence In The Kansas Farm Sector: A Tripartite Decomposition Using The Dea Approach," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6069, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Dayton Lambert & Christopher Clark & Michael Wilcox & Seong-Hoon Cho, 2011. "Distance, density, local amenities, and suburban development preferences in a rapidly growing East Tennessee county," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 28(4), pages 519-532, December.
    3. Sabasi, Darlington & Shumway, C. Richard, 2014. "Technical Change, Efficiency, and Total Factor Productivity in U.S. Agriculture," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170225, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Waleerat Suphannachart, 2013. "Total Factor Productivity of Main and Second Rice Production in Thailand," Applied Economics Journal, Kasetsart University, Faculty of Economics, Center for Applied Economic Research, vol. 20(1), pages 1-22, June.
    5. King, John L. & Toole, Andrew A. & Fuglie, Keith O., 2012. "The Complementary Roles of the Public and Private Sectors in U.S. Agricultural Research and Development," Economic Brief 138925, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    6. Drine, Imed, 2011. "Climate Variability and Agricultural Productivity in MENA region," WIDER Working Paper Series 096, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Anonymous, 2008. "The 30-Year Challenge: Agriculture's Strategic Role in Feeding and Fueling a Growing World," Issue Reports 45719, Farm Foundation.
    8. Jones, Carol Adaire & Nickerson, Cynthia J. & Heisey, Paul W., 2012. "New Uses of Old Tools: An Assessment of Current and Potential Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Sector-based Policies," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124735, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Nin-Pratt, Alejandro & Johnson, Michael E. & Yu, Bingxin, 2012. "Improved performance of agriculture in Africa South of the Sahara: Taking off or bouncing back?," IFPRI discussion papers 1224, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Yeager, Elizabeth A. & Langemeier, Michael R., 2011. "Productivity Divergence across Kansas Farms," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 40(2), August.
    11. Mugera, Amin W. & Langemeier, Michael R. & Featherstone, Allen M., 2012. "Labor Productivity Growth in the Kansas Farm Sector: A Tripartite Decomposition Using a Non-Parametric Approach," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 41(3), December.
    12. Alston, Julian M. & Pardey, Philip G., 2014. "Agricultural R&D, Food Prices, Poverty and Malnutrition Redux," Staff Papers 162413, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    13. Chapoto, Antony & Mabiso, Athur & Bonsu, Adwinmea, 2013. "Agricultural commercialization, land expansion, and homegrown land-scale farmers: Insights from Ghana:," IFPRI discussion papers 1286, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Olson, Kent D. & Vu, Linh, 2009. "Productivity Growth, Technical Efficiency and Technical Change on Minnesota Farms," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49204, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    15. Nuria Quella, 2009. "Knowledge Spillovers and TFP Growth Rates," Department of Economics Working Papers 09-03, Stony Brook University, Department of Economics.

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