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Climate Variability and Agricultural Productivity in MENA region

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  • Drine, Imed

Abstract

The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is particularly vulnerable to climate change. The severity of climate-change impacts is related to the geographic and ecological particularity of the region. The majority of countries in the MENA region belong to the hydraulic poor regions located between the tempered region of the Northern hemisphere and the inter-tropical region, characterized by scarcity and spatial and temporal rainfall variability. This paper describes, first, the interaction between climate changes, agriculture and food security in the MENA region. Second, an empirical model is used to test the impact of climate variability on agricultural productivity. Our results suggest that lower precipitation, heat waves and drought are the main causes of decreasing agricultural productivity in the region.

Suggested Citation

  • Drine, Imed, 2011. "Climate Variability and Agricultural Productivity in MENA region," WIDER Working Paper Series 096, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:wp2011-96
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    File URL: http://www.wider.unu.edu/sites/default/files/wp2011-096.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frisvold, George & Ingram, Kevin, 1995. "Sources of agricultural productivity growth and stagnation in sub-Saharan Africa," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 13(1), October.
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    3. Fuglie, Keith O. & MacDonald, James C. & Ball, V. Eldon, 2007. "Productivity Growth in U.S. Agriculture," Economic Brief 6382, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. George Battese & D. Rao & Christopher O'Donnell, 2004. "A Metafrontier Production Function for Estimation of Technical Efficiencies and Technology Gaps for Firms Operating Under Different Technologies," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 91-103, January.
    5. Barbara J. Craig & Philip G. Pardey & Johannes Roseboom, 1997. "International Productivity Patterns: Accounting for Input Quality, Infrastructure, and Research," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1064-1076.
    6. Frisvold, George & Ingram, Kevin, 1995. "Sources of agricultural productivity growth and stagnation in sub-Saharan Africa," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 51-61, October.
    7. William R. Cline, 2007. "Global Warming and Agriculture: Impact Estimates by Country," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 4037.
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    Keywords

    agricultural productivity; climate change; MENA region; Malmquist productivity;

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