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The Formal Logic Of Testing Structural Change In Meat Demand: A Methodological Analysis

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  • Davis, George C.

Abstract

In the past two decades, the profession has expended valuable resources testing structural change in meat demand with mixed results. Overlooked to date is a fundamental methodological problem that transcends all of the methods of testing for structural change. In this study, a formal logic framework is utilized in which methodological problems associated with any hypothesis test can be analyzed. Within this framework, it is proven that there is no valid test of any single hypothesis, including structural change. Because of this result, additional criteria from the methodology literature are then used to evaluate the literature on structural change in meat demand.

Suggested Citation

  • Davis, George C., 1997. "The Formal Logic Of Testing Structural Change In Meat Demand: A Methodological Analysis," Faculty Paper Series 23975, Texas A&M University, Department of Agricultural Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:tamufp:23975
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/23975
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew T. Holt & Joseph V. Balagtas, 2009. "Estimating Structural Change with Smooth Transition Regressions: An Application to Meat Demand," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1424-1431.
    2. Rodriguez, Nestor & Eales, James S., 2015. "Structural Change via Threshold Effects: Estimating U.S. Meat Demand Using Smooth Transition Functions and the Effects of More Women in the Labor Force," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 206522, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Bryant, Henry L. & Davis, George C., 2003. "Information Based Model Averaging And Internal Metanalysis In Seemingly Unrelated Regressions With An Application To A Demand System," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 21918, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. William G. Tomek & Harry M. Kaiser, 1999. "On improving econometric analyses of generic advertising impacts," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 485-500.
    5. Davis, George C., 2004. "The Structure of Models: Understanding Theory Reduction and Testing with a Production Example," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(01), April.
    6. Wildner, S. & Cramon-Taubadel, S.v., 2000. "Die Bedeutung von Veränderungen der Nachfrage für die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit des Agrarsektors: erste Ergebnisse einer neuen Nachfrageschätzung," Proceedings "Schriften der Gesellschaft für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften des Landbaues e.V.", German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA), vol. 36.
    7. Bryant, Henry L. & Davis, George C., 2001. "Beyond The Model Specification Problem: Model And Parameter Averaging Using Bayesian Techniques," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20689, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    8. Chen Zhen & Michael K. Wohlgenant, 2006. "Meat Demand under Rational Habit Persistence," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 54(4), pages 477-495, December.

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