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Beach Quality and Recreational Values: A Pictorialized Stated Preference Analysis of Residents and Tourists

  • Penn, Jerrod
  • Hu, Wuyang
  • Cox, Linda J.
  • Kozloff, Lara

Much of Hawaii’s economy relies on its unique marine environments, which are threatened by degradation from stormwater runoff. Using a stated preference method of choice-based conjoint (CBC) analysis, based on stylized photographs, this study examines both residents’ and visitors’ marginal value for levels of attributes associated with Hawaiian beach recreation. Each attribute (sand quality, water quality, congestion and water safety conditions) was significant for both residents and tourists, with water quality being the single most important attribute. There is little distinction between resident and tourist marginal value, except for a greater value lost for below average water quality among tourists.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/119813
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Paper provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2012 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2012, Birmingham, Alabama with number 119813.

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Date of creation: Feb 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:saea12:119813
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.saea.org/

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  1. James Mak & James E.T. Moncur, 1996. "Political Economy of Protecting Unique Recreational Resources: Hanauma Bay, Hawai'i," Working Papers 199606, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  2. Beharry-Borg, Nesha & Scarpa, Riccardo, 2010. "Valuing quality changes in Caribbean coastal waters for heterogeneous beach visitors," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 1124-1139, March.
  3. Kenneth E. Train, 1998. "Recreation Demand Models with Taste Differences over People," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(2), pages 230-239.
  4. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132.
  5. Bateman, Ian J. & Day, Brett H. & Jones, Andrew P. & Jude, Simon, 2009. "Reducing gain-loss asymmetry: A virtual reality choice experiment valuing land use change," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 106-118, July.
  6. Bell, Frederick W. & Leeworthy, Vernon R., 1990. "Recreational demand by tourists for saltwater beach days," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 189-205, May.
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