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Geographical Analysis of US Green Sector Industry Concentration

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  • Register, D. Lane
  • Lambert, Dayton M.
  • English, Burton C.
  • Jensen, Kimberly L.
  • Menard, R. Jamey
  • Wilcox, Michael D.

Abstract

This paper analyzes the geographic distribution of “green energy” sector clustering in the lower 48 United States using recent developments in industry concentration analysis. Evidence suggests that the ten green energy subsectors and the aggregate of the firms comprising the green energy sector are regionally concentrated. Positive changes in industry concentration from 2002 to 2006 tended to be greatest in non-metropolitan counties, suggesting comparative advantage with respect to site location for the composite of firms making up these sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Register, D. Lane & Lambert, Dayton M. & English, Burton C. & Jensen, Kimberly L. & Menard, R. Jamey & Wilcox, Michael D., 2012. "Geographical Analysis of US Green Sector Industry Concentration," 2012 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2012, Birmingham, Alabama 119742, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saea12:119742
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/119742
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Camilo Sarmiento & William W. Wilson & Bruce Dahl, 2012. "Spatial Competition and Ethanol Plant Location Decisions," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(3), pages 260-273, June.
    2. Lambert, Dayton M. & McNamara, Kevin T. & Garrett, Megan I., 2006. "An Application of Spatial Poisson Models to Manufacturing Investment Location Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 38(01), April.
    3. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    4. Paulo Guimarães & Octávio Figueiredo & Douglas Woodward, 2007. "Measuring The Localization Of Economic Activity: A Parametric Approach," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(4), pages 753-774.
    5. Edward L. Glaeser & Glenn Ellison, 1999. "The Geographic Concentration of Industry: Does Natural Advantage Explain Agglomeration?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 311-316, May.
    6. Guimarães, Paulo & Figueiredo, Octávio & Woodward, Douglas, 2009. "Dartboard tests for the location quotient," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 360-364, May.
    7. Lambert, Dayton M. & Wilcox, Michael D. & English, Alicia & Stewart, Lance A., 2008. "Ethanol Plant Location Determinants and County Comparative Advantage," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 40(01), April.
    8. Lambert, Dayton M. & McNamara, Kevin T. & Beeler, Megan I., 2007. "Location Determinants of Food Manufacturing Investment: Are Non-metropolitan Counties Competitive?," 2007 Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland, Oregon TN 9706, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. Thomas J. Holmes & John J. Stevens, 2002. "Geographic Concentration and Establishment Scale," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(4), pages 682-690, November.
    10. Salvador Barrios & Luisito Bertinelli & Eric Strobl, 2006. "Geographic Concentration And Establishment Scale: An Extension Using Panel Data," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 733-746.
    11. Paulo Guimaraes & Octávio Figueiredo & Douglas Woodward, 2004. "Industrial Location Modeling: Extending the Random Utility Framework," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(1), pages 1-20.
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    Keywords

    Agglomeration; Location Quotient; Renewable Energy; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Industrial Organization; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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