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Opportunities to Improve Household Food Security Through Promoting Informal Maize Marketing Channels: Experience from Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

  • Traub, Lulama Ndibongo
  • Jayne, Thomas S.

Maize meal is a staple food in South Africa, particularly among the poor. The South African government by the mid-1980s enacted a series of legislations aimed at reducing the role of government within the market and placing increasing reliance on market forces and the private sector. Ex post studies of the impact of maize market reform in neighboring countries found that, in general, the reforms led to lower maize milling/retailing margins in real terms. However, in the case of South Africa, recent analysis indicates that maize market reform has not reduced processing and retailing margins in the maize meal supply chain. The study objectives are to determine actual and potential consumer demand for the types of maize meal capable of being produced by small-scale mills, to measure the potential impact of small-scale grain retailing and milling channels on households’ disposable income and food security, and to identify the factors responsible for the negligible role of small-scale milling sector in South Africa.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/54568
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Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Food Security International Development Working Papers with number 54568.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:54568
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Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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  1. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132.
  2. Traub, Lulama Ndibongo & Jayne, Thomas S., 2004. "The Effects of Market Reform on Maize Marketing Margins in South Africa," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54570, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  3. Tschirley, David L. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Mukumbu, Mulinge & Chisvo, Munhamo & Weber, Michael T. & Zulu, Ballard & Johansson, Robert C. & Santos, Paula Mota & Soroko, David, 1999. "Successes and Challenges of Food Market Reform: Experiences from Kenya, Mozambique, Zambia, and Zimbabwe," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11270, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  4. Ju-Chin Huang, 2001. "Precision of dichotomous choice contingent valuation welfare measures: some simulation results," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(1), pages 91-101.
  5. Jayne, T. S. & Argwings-Kodhek, Gem, 1997. "Consumer response to maize market liberalization in urban Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 447-458, October.
  6. Adamowicz, Wiktor L. & Boxall, Peter C. & Williams, Michael & Louviere, Jordan, 1995. "Stated Preference Approaches for Measuring Passive Use Values: Choice Experiments versus Contingent Valuation," Staff Paper Series 24126, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
  7. Wiktor Adamowicz & Peter Boxall & Michael Williams & Jordan Louviere, 1998. "Stated Preference Approaches for Measuring Passive Use Values: Choice Experiments and Contingent Valuation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(1), pages 64-75.
  8. Adamowicz W. & Louviere J. & Williams M., 1994. "Combining Revealed and Stated Preference Methods for Valuing Environmental Amenities," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 271-292, May.
  9. Muyanga, Milu & Jayne, Thomas S. & Argwings-Kodhek, Gem & Ariga, Joshua, 2005. "Staple Food Consumption Patterns in Urban Kenya: Trends and Policy Implications," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 55163, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  10. Tschirley, David & Donovan, Cynthia & Weber, Michael T., 1996. "Food aid and food markets: lessons from Mozambique," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 189-209, May.
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