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What Explains Wage Gaps Between Farm And City? Exploring The Todaro Model With American Evidence 1890-1941

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  • Hatton, Timothy
  • Williamson, Jeffrey

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Hatton, Timothy & Williamson, Jeffrey, 1989. "What Explains Wage Gaps Between Farm And City? Exploring The Todaro Model With American Evidence 1890-1941," Harvard Institute of Economic Research (HIER) Archive 294563, Harvard University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:harier:294563
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.294563
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/294563/files/harvard109.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Alonso-Carrera, Jaime & Raurich, Xavier, 2018. "Labor mobility, structural change and economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 292-310.
    2. Diao, Xinshen & Dyck, John H. & Lee, Chinkook & Skully, David W. & Somwaru, Agapi, 1999. "Structural Change And Agricultural Protection: The Costs Of Korean Agricultural Policy 1975 And 1990," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21492, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Bencivenga, Valerie R & Smith, Bruce D, 1997. "Unemployment, Migration, and Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(3), pages 582-608, June.
    4. Arjan de Haan, 2006. "Migration in the Development Studies Literature: Has It Come Out of Its Marginality?," WIDER Working Paper Series RP2006-19, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Dennis, Benjamin N. & Iscan, Talan B., 2007. "Productivity growth and agricultural out-migration in the United States," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 52-74, March.
    6. BetrĂ¡n, Concha & Pons, Maria A., 2011. "Labour market response to globalisation: Spain, 1880-1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 169-188, April.
    7. Falkinger, Josef & Grossmann, Volker, 2013. "Oligarchic land ownership, entrepreneurship, and economic development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 206-215.
    8. Chul-In Lee, 2015. "Agglomeration, search frictions and growth of cities in developing economies," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 55(2), pages 421-451, December.
    9. de Haan, A., 2011. "Inclusive growth?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 22201, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    10. Dong, Qi & Murakami, Tomoaki & Nakashima, Yasuhiro, 2018. "Modeling the Labor Transfers from the Agricultural Sector to the Non-agricultural Sector under Food Supply Constraint in China," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274161, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. Carol Scott Leonard & Leonid Borodkin, 2000. "The Rural Urban Wage Gap in the Industrialization of Russia, 1885-1913," Economics Series Working Papers 14, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    12. Zachary Ward, 2019. "Internal Migration, Education and Upward Rank Mobility:Evidence from American History," CEH Discussion Papers 04, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

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