IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aesc14/170791.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A spatially explicit national demand model for forest recreation in Ireland

Author

Listed:
  • Upton, Vincent
  • Ryan, Mary
  • O’Donoghue, Cathal

Abstract

Forest benefits are now commonly understood through the ecosystem service framework. Recreational visits to forests, considered an important cultural service, have been the target of a significant proportion of the non-market valuation literature to date. Such models have evolved from relatively simple travel cost models to employing GIS to develop spatial demand models. Due to restrictions on accessing private land, forests are a particularly important recreational resource in Ireland as those which are publicly owned are accessible to the public and free to use. In addition, recent policies directed at private forests have included attempts to encourage owners to open their forests to the public. This study outlines the development of a spatially explicit recreation demand model for Ireland that describes how visitation differs across the population based on population characteristics and existing recreational resources. The model combines a zero-inflated negative binomial model of annual forest visits of a random sample of individuals with a simulated population model of Ireland and spatial data on household location. The results include an estimation of annual forest visitation and the development of a demand map that highlights where forest expansion could be targeted to maximise the recreational value of afforestation.

Suggested Citation

  • Upton, Vincent & Ryan, Mary & O’Donoghue, Cathal, 2014. "A spatially explicit national demand model for forest recreation in Ireland," 88th Annual Conference, April 9-11, 2014, AgroParisTech, Paris, France 170791, Agricultural Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aesc14:170791
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/170791
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Zandersen, Marianne & Tol, Richard S.J., 2009. "A meta-analysis of forest recreation values in Europe," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1-2), pages 109-130, January.
    2. Scarpa, Riccardo & Chilton, Susan M. & Hutchinson, W. George & Buongiorno, Joseph, 2000. "Valuing the recreational benefits from the creation of nature reserves in Irish forests," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 237-250, May.
    3. Bateman, Ian J. & Day, Brett H. & Georgiou, Stavros & Lake, Iain, 2006. "The aggregation of environmental benefit values: Welfare measures, distance decay and total WTP," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 450-460, December.
    4. Daniel Hellerstein & Robert Mendelsohn, 1993. "A Theoretical Foundation for Count Data Models," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 75(3), pages 604-611.
    5. William H. Greene, 1994. "Accounting for Excess Zeros and Sample Selection in Poisson and Negative Binomial Regression Models," Working Papers 94-10, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    6. Timothy C. Haab & Kenneth E. McConnell, 1996. "Count Data Models and the Problem of Zeros in Recreation Demand Analysis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(1), pages 89-102.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Forestry; Recreation demand; GIS; Environmental Economics and Policy; International Relations/Trade; Land Economics/Use; Research Methods/ Statistical Methods; Q51;

    JEL classification:

    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aesc14:170791. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aesukea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.