IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Flood prone risk and amenity values: a spatial hedonic analysis


  • Samarasinghe, Oshadhi
  • Sharp, Basil M.H.


This study examines the impact of flood hazard zone location on residential property values. The study utilises data from over 2,000 private residential property sales occurred during 2006 in North Shore City, New Zealand. A spatial autoregressive hedonic model is developed to provide efficient estimates of the marginal effect of flood prone risks on property values. Our results suggest that a property located within a flood hazard zone sells for 4.3% less than an equivalent property located outside the flood hazard zone. Given the median house price, estimated discount associated with flood risks is approximately NZ$22,000.

Suggested Citation

  • Samarasinghe, Oshadhi & Sharp, Basil M.H., 2008. "Flood prone risk and amenity values: a spatial hedonic analysis," 2008 Conference (52nd), February 5-8, 2008, Canberra, Australia 6013, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare08:6013

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Robert W. Paterson & Kevin J. Boyle, 2002. "Out of Sight, Out of Mind? Using GIS to Incorporate Visibility in Hedonic Property Value Models," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(3), pages 417-425.
    2. Steven C Bourassa & Martin Hoesli & Jian Sun, 2004. "What's in a view?," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 36(8), pages 1427-1450, August.
    3. Benson, Earl D & Hansen, Julia L. & Schwartz Jr., Arthur & Smersh, Greg T., 1998. "Pricing Residential Amenities: The Value of a View," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 55-73, January.
    4. Okmyung Bin & Jamie Brown Kruse & Craig E. Landry, 2008. "Flood Hazards, Insurance Rates, and Amenities: Evidence From the Coastal Housing Market," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 75(1), pages 63-82.
    5. Case, Anne C, 1991. "Spatial Patterns in Household Demand," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(4), pages 953-965, July.
    6. Won Kim, Chong & Phipps, Tim T. & Anselin, Luc, 2003. "Measuring the benefits of air quality improvement: a spatial hedonic approach," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 24-39, January.
    7. Austin Troy & Jeff Romm, 2004. "Assessing the price effects of flood hazard disclosure under the California natural hazard disclosure law (AB 1195)," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 137-162.
    8. Randall S. Guttery & Stephen L. Poe & C. F. Sirmans, 2004. "An Empirical Investigation of Federal Wetlands Regulation and Flood Delineation: Implications for Residential Property Owners," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 26(3), pages 229-316.
    9. Basu, Sabyasachi & Thibodeau, Thomas G, 1998. "Analysis of Spatial Autocorrelation in House Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 61-85, July.
    10. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    11. James M. Holway & Raymond J. Burby, 1990. "The Effects of Floodplain Development Controls on Residential Land Values," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 66(3), pages 259-271.
    12. Linneman, Peter, 1980. "Some empirical results on the nature of the hedonic price function for the urban housing market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 47-68, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Flood hazard; Spatial hedonic; Amenity value; Land Economics/Use; Q15; Q51;

    JEL classification:

    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aare08:6013. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.