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An Analysis of the Housing Market before and after the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake

Author

Listed:
  • Kurt J. Beron
  • James C. Murdoch
  • Mark A. Thayer
  • Wim P. M. Vijverberg

Abstract

Residential housing sales data from the San Francisco Bay area are merged with earthquake hazard measures, geologic measures, neighborhood quality measures, and community characteristics in order to estimate the hedonic price of earthquake risk before and after the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. The estimates suggest that the hedonic price fell after the earthquake, indicating that consumers had initially overestimated the earthquake hazard. This suggests that information about earthquake risks is imperfect and that some efficiency may be realized by devoting more resources to earthquake risk communication.

Suggested Citation

  • Kurt J. Beron & James C. Murdoch & Mark A. Thayer & Wim P. M. Vijverberg, 1997. "An Analysis of the Housing Market before and after the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 73(1), pages 101-113.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:73:y:1997:i:1:p:101-113
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nakagawa, Masayuki & Saito, Makoto & Yamaga, Hisaki, 2007. "Earthquake risk and housing rents: Evidence from the Tokyo Metropolitan Area," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 87-99, January.
    2. Naoi, Michio & Seko, Miki & Sumita, Kazuto, 2009. "Earthquake risk and housing prices in Japan: Evidence before and after massive earthquakes," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 658-669, November.
    3. Carolyn Kousky, 2010. "Learning from Extreme Events: Risk Perceptions after the Flood," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 86(3).
    4. Hans R.A. Koster & Jos N. van Ommeren, 2015. "Natural Gas Extraction, Earthquakes and House Prices," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-038/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Okmyung Biny & Stephen Polasky, 2004. "Effects of Flood Hazards on Property Values: Evidence Before and After Hurricane Floyd," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 80(4).
    6. Masayuki Nakagawa & Makoto Saito & Hisaki Yamaga, 2009. "Earthquake Risks And Land Prices: Evidence From The Tokyo Metropolitan Area," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 60(2), pages 208-222.
    7. Marco Modica & Roberto Zoboli & Fabrizio Meroni & Vera Pessina & Thea Squarcina & Mario Locati, 2016. "Housing Market Response to 2012 Northern Italy Earthquake: The role of house quality and changing risk perception," SEEDS Working Papers 0416, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised Apr 2016.
    8. Mueller, Julie M. & Loomis, John B., 2008. "Spatial Dependence in Hedonic Property Models: Do Different Corrections For Spatial Dependence Result in Economically Significant Differences in Estimated Implicit Prices?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 33(2), August.
    9. Kenta Tanaka & Shunsuke Managi, 2016. "Impact Of A Disaster On Land Price: Evidence From Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(01), pages 1-15, March.
    10. Greg Barron & Eldad Yechiam, 2009. "The coexistence of overestimation and underweighting of rare events and the contingent recency effect," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 4(6), pages 447-460, October.
    11. Zhu, Hongjia & Deng, Yongheng & Zhu, Rong & He, Xiaobo, 2016. "Fear of nuclear power? Evidence from Fukushima nuclear accident and land markets in China," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 139-154.
    12. Michael LaCour-Little & Arsenio Staer, 2016. "Earthquakes and Price Discovery in the Housing Market: Evidence from New Zealand," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 19(4), pages 493-513.
    13. Daniel, Vanessa E. & Florax, Raymond J.G.M. & Rietveld, Piet, 2009. "Flooding risk and housing values: An economic assessment of environmental hazard," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 355-365, December.
    14. Julie Mueller & John Loomis & Armando González-Cabán, 2009. "Do Repeated Wildfires Change Homebuyers’ Demand for Homes in High-Risk Areas? A Hedonic Analysis of the Short and Long-Term Effects of Repeated Wildfires on House Prices in Southern California," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 155-172, February.
    15. Koster, Hans R.A. & Ommeren, Jos van, 2015. "A shaky business: Natural gas extraction, earthquakes and house prices," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 120-139.
    16. Samarasinghe, Oshadhi & Sharp, Basil, 2010. "Flood prone risk and amenity values: a spatial hedonic analysis," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 54(4), December.
    17. Deng, Guoying & Gan, Li & Hernandez, Manuel A., 2015. "Do natural disasters cause an excessive fear of heights? Evidence from the Wenchuan earthquake," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 79-89.
    18. James R. Meldrum, 2016. "Floodplain Price Impacts by Property Type in Boulder County, Colorado: Condominiums Versus Standalone Properties," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 64(4), pages 725-750, August.
    19. David Merrell & Kevin M. Simmons & Daniel Sutter, 2005. "The Determinants of Tornado Casualties and the Benefits of Tornado Shelters," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(1).
    20. Bin, Okmyung & Landry, Craig E., 2013. "Changes in implicit flood risk premiums: Empirical evidence from the housing market," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 65(3), pages 361-376.
    21. Shih Hsiung Chou & Shih Hung Chih, 2001. "Metropolis: Impact Assessment of Flood Risk on Housing Property Market in Taipei," ERES eres2001_132, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    22. Hidano, Noboru & Hoshino, Tadao & Sugiura, Ayako, 2015. "The effect of seismic hazard risk information on property prices: Evidence from a spatial regression discontinuity design," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 113-122.
    23. repec:eee:regeco:v:69:y:2018:i:c:p:153-166 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Hallstrom, Daniel G. & Smith, V. Kerry, 2005. "Market responses to hurricanes," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 541-561, November.
    25. Marc N. Conte & David L. Kelly, 2016. "An Imperfect Storm: Fat-Tailed Hurricane Damages, Insurance and Climate Policy," Working Papers 2016-01, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

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