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Taking a closer look at multiple criteria analysis and economic evaluation


  • Hajkowicz, Stefan


Multiple criteria analysis (MCA) has been widely applied within the field of natural resource management since the 1970s. During this period MCA has undergone considerable methodological advancement with numerous methods for capturing decision maker preferences, ranking or scoring decision options, handling uncertainty and presenting results. This paper explores the role of MCA within the economist’s evaluation toolkit, which also contains benefit cost analysis (BCA), cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) and cost utility analysis (CUA). A process for selecting an appropriate evaluation tool is proposed, which is partly dependent on the extent to which environmental goods can be valued in monetary units.

Suggested Citation

  • Hajkowicz, Stefan, 2006. "Taking a closer look at multiple criteria analysis and economic evaluation," 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia 139785, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare06:139785

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Robert T. Eckenrode, 1965. "Weighting Multiple Criteria," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 12(3), pages 180-192, November.
    2. Cullen, Ross & Fairburn, Geoffrey A. & Hughey, Kenneth F. D., 2001. "Measuring the productivity of threatened-species programs," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 53-66, October.
    3. Adamowicz, Wiktor L., 2004. "What's it worth? An examination of historical trends and future directions in environmental valuation," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 48(3), September.
    4. Brouwer, Roy & van Ek, Remco, 2004. "Integrated ecological, economic and social impact assessment of alternative flood control policies in the Netherlands," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1-2), pages 1-21, September.
    5. Bertrand Mareschal & Jean Pierre Brans & Philippe Vincke, 1986. "How to select and how to rank projects: the Prométhée method," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/9307, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    6. Charles W. Abdalla & Brian A. Roach & Donald J. Epp, 1992. "Valuing Environmental Quality Changes Using Averting Expenditures: An Application to Groundwater Contamination," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(2), pages 163-169.
    7. Peter A. Diamond & Jerry A. Hausman, 1994. "Contingent Valuation: Is Some Number Better than No Number?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 45-64, Fall.
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    Cited by:

    1. Schlör, Holger & Fischer, Wolfgang & Hake, Jürgen-Friedrich, 2013. "Methods of measuring sustainable development of the German energy sector," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 172-181.


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