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The Evolution of the California Blueberry Industry: A Social Network Analysis Approach

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  • Plakias, Zoe T.

Abstract

In this paper, I estimate local and industry peer effects related to the adoption of blueberries as a crop among California growers. I employ publicly available data from the California Department of Pesticide Regulation for the years 2001 through 2011. Geographic and inter-industry network analyses complement the econometric estimation and provide greater insight into the patterns of peer effects. Industry peer effects (i.e. those connections to other growers through growing crops other than blueberries) have a positive and statistically significant effect on the probability of adopting blueberries. Local effects play a significant, though seemingly less important, role. The geographic and social network analyses corroborate these results and provide greater depth. I find this type of analysis can over some insight about crop adoption without the expense necessary for most social network studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Plakias, Zoe T., 2014. "The Evolution of the California Blueberry Industry: A Social Network Analysis Approach," 2014 AAEA/EAAE/CAES Joint Symposium: Social Networks, Social Media and the Economics of Food, May 29-30, 2014, Montreal, Canada 166093, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Canadian Agricultural Economics Society;European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aajs14:166093
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
    2. Scott E. Carrell & Richard L. Fullerton & James E. West, 2009. "Does Your Cohort Matter? Measuring Peer Effects in College Achievement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(3), pages 439-464, July.
    3. Timothy G. Conley & Christopher R. Udry, 2010. "Learning about a New Technology: Pineapple in Ghana," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 35-69.
    4. Bruce Sacerdote, 2001. "Peer Effects with Random Assignment: Results for Dartmouth Roommates," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 681-704.
    5. Emily Oster & Rebecca Thornton, 2009. "Determinants of Technology Adoption: Private Value and Peer Effects in Menstrual Cup Take-Up," NBER Working Papers 14828, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Bryan Bollinger & Kenneth Gillingham, 2012. "Peer Effects in the Diffusion of Solar Photovoltaic Panels," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 31(6), pages 900-912, November.
    7. Giacomo De Giorgi & Michele Pellizzari & Silvia Redaelli, 2010. "Identification of Social Interactions through Partially Overlapping Peer Groups," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 241-275, April.
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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Crop Production/Industries;

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