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Classroom or Pub – Where are Persistent Peer Relationships between University Students Formed?

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  • Fischer, Thomas
  • Rode, Johannes

Abstract

This paper discusses the formation of peers in an anonymous higher education setting using a unique data set of industrial engineering students. For identification, we exploit the random assignment of students into groups and student performance before students met. We compare two different settings for potential peer formation: a voluntary freshman orientation week organized by the students’ union and a mandatory group work course. It is only in the case of the group work course that we report persistent impacts on subsequent academic achievement. In line with our theoretical reasoning, peer effects exist between groups of two students who were already similar before.
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  • Fischer, Thomas & Rode, Johannes, 2019. "Classroom or Pub – Where are Persistent Peer Relationships between University Students Formed?," Publications of Darmstadt Technical University, Institute for Business Studies (BWL) 119281, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute for Business Studies (BWL).
  • Handle: RePEc:dar:wpaper:119281
    Note: for complete metadata visit http://tubiblio.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/119281/
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation

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