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Effectiveness of agricultural extension with respect to farm size: The case of Uganda

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  • Betz, Michael R.

Abstract

Raising the incomes of agricultural households is central to reducing poverty in Uganda. In many areas of the country agriculture has encroached into marginal or fragile lands, leaving little room for the expansion of agricultural lands (Kraybill, Bashaasha, and Betz 2009). Additionally, soil degradation has become a barrier to agricultural productivity (Pender et al. 2004), especially in the Eastern region of the country. Farmers now look for alternatives that will increase output without further depleting soil fertility or expanding into fragile lands. Agricultural extension is the primary government mechanism through which developing country governments attempt to improve the knowledge and methods that farmers use to increase output; However, many extension programs throughout Sub-Saharan Africa have the reputation of being largely ineffective (Dejene 1989; Gautam 2000). This study estimates an agricultural production function for 3 farm sizes to determine whether agricultural extension has differential effects on farms of different size. Extension is found to have a positive and significant relationship with the value of output produced for small and large farms, but has not significant relationship with the value of output for medium size farms. This result has distinct policy implications for the design and implementation of agricultural extension programs in Uganda and other parts of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Betz, Michael R., 2009. "Effectiveness of agricultural extension with respect to farm size: The case of Uganda," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49471, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea09:49471
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.49471
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Binswanger, Hans P, 1993. "Wealth, Weather Risk and the Composition and Profitability of Agricultural Investments," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(416), pages 56-78, January.
    2. Birkhaeuser, Dean & Evenson, Robert E & Feder, Gershon, 1991. "The Economic Impact of Agricultural Extension: A Review," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(3), pages 607-650, April.
    3. Owens, Trudy & Hoddinott, John & Kinsey, Bill, 2003. "The Impact of Agricultural Extension on Farm Production in Resettlement Areas of Zimbabwe," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(2), pages 337-357, January.
    4. Pender, John & Nkonya, Ephraim & Jagger, Pamela & Sserunkuuma, Dick & Ssali, Henry, 2004. "Strategies to increase agricultural productivity and reduce land degradation: evidence from Uganda," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 31(2-3), pages 181-195, December.
    5. Owens, Trudy & Hoddinott, John & Kinsey, Bill, 2003. "The Impact of Agricultural Extension on Farm Production in Resettlement Areas of Zimbabwe," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(2), pages 337-357, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lazzaroni, Sara, 2013. "Weather variability and food consumption: Evidence from rural Uganda," 2013 Second Congress, June 6-7, 2013, Parma, Italy 149774, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
    2. Twongyirwe, Ronald & Bariyo, Rogers & Odongo, Hannington & Muchunguzi, Charles & Kemigisha, Prudence & Nyakato, Viola, 2020. "Good intentions, bad extension systems? How the ‘Garden Store Approach’ crippled tea expansion in Kigezi sub-region, SW Uganda," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 180(C).
    3. World Bank, . "Ugandan Coffee Supply Chain Risk Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank, number 27386.
    4. Do Huy Thiep & Nguyen Thi Cam Nhung, 2018. "Impacts of accessing extension on agricultural production profit: Empirical evidence from the Vietnam Access to Rural Households Survey," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2018-104, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Do Huy Thiep & Nguyen Thi Cam Nhung, 2018. "Impacts of accessing extension on agricultural production profit: Empirical evidence from the Vietnam Access to Rural Households Survey," WIDER Working Paper Series 104, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Farm Management; International Development; Production Economics;
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