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Out of Site out of Mind: Quantifying the Long-term Off-site economic Impacts of Land Degradation in Kenya

  • Nkonya, Ephraim M.
  • Gicheru, Patrick
  • Woelcke, Johannes
  • Okoba, Barrack
  • Kilambya, Daniel
  • Gachimbi, Louis

This study investigated the private and social returns to Sustainable Land Management (SLM) practices with an objective of finding practices that reduce the on-farm and off-farm negative effects of land degradation. The results show that SLM practices have robust profits for farmers raising dairy cows. Farmers without dairy cows realize profits that are sensitive to input and output prices. Adoption of SLM also provides global environmental services whose value is about 10% of the net present value. The results suggest the need to promote SLM practices with multiple uses and consider ways to compensate farmers who offer significant environmental services.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/21344
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Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA with number 21344.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea06:21344
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  1. Pender, John L., 1996. "Discount rates and credit markets: Theory and evidence from rural india," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 257-296, August.
  2. Wiebe, Keith D., 2003. "Linking Land Quality, Agricultural Productivity, And Food Security," Agricultural Economics Reports 34073, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  3. Stefano Pagiola, 1996. "Price policy and returns to soil conservation in semi-arid Kenya," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 8(3), pages 225-271, October.
  4. Scherr, Sara J. & Yadav, Satya N., 1996. "Land degradation in the developing world: implications for food, agriculture, and the environment to 2020," 2020 vision discussion papers 14, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. R. L. Voortman & B. G. J. S. Sonneveld & M. A. Keyzer, 2000. "African Land Ecology: Opportunities and Constraints for Agricultural Development," CID Working Papers 37, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  6. Moore, Walter B. & McCarl, Bruce A., 1987. "Off-Site Costs Of Soil Erosion: A Case Study In The Willamette Valley," Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 12(01), July.
  7. Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Pender, John & Kaizzi, Crammer & Edward, Kato & Mugarura, Samuel, 2005. "Policy options for increasing crop productivity and reducing soil nutrient depletion and poverty in Uganda:," EPTD discussion papers 134, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Fafchamps, Marcel & Pender, John, 1997. "Precautionary Saving, Credit Constraints, and Irreversible Investment: Theory and Evidence from Semiarid India," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(2), pages 180-94, April.
  9. Holden, Stein T. & Shiferaw, Bekele & Wik, Mette, 1998. "Poverty, market imperfections and time preferences: of relevance for environmental policy?," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(01), pages 105-130, February.
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