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Not Playing The Game: Non-Particpation In Repeated Discrete Choice Models


  • von Haefen, Roger H.
  • Adamowicz, Wiktor L.


This paper develops and empirically evaluates alternative econometric strategies for accounting for non-participation - repeated choice of the same alternative or same type of alternative - in data sets that are typically analyzed within the repeated discrete choice framework. Random coefficient single and double hurdle variants of the repeated discrete choice model are developed and applied to stated preference data. The empirical results suggest that significant statistical improvements in fit can arise with the single and double models relative to more traditional models. However, similar to Haab and McConnell's (1996) findings in the context of count data models, these gains are diminished when the analyst accounts for unobserved heterogeneity through random coefficients.

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  • von Haefen, Roger H. & Adamowicz, Wiktor L., 2003. "Not Playing The Game: Non-Particpation In Repeated Discrete Choice Models," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22037, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22037

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Wiktor Adamowicz & Peter Boxall & Michael Williams & Jordan Louviere, 1998. "Stated Preference Approaches for Measuring Passive Use Values: Choice Experiments and Contingent Valuation," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(1), pages 64-75.
    2. Adamowicz, Wiktor L., 1994. "Habit Formation And Variety Seeking In A Discrete Choice Model Of Recreation Demand," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(01), July.
    3. von Haefen, Roger H., 2003. "Incorporating observed choice into the construction of welfare measures from random utility models," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 145-165, March.
    4. Shonkwiler, John Scott & Shaw, W. Douglass, 1996. "Hurdle Count-Data Models In Recreation Demand Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 21(02), December.
    5. Raymond S. Hartman & Michael J. Doane & Chi-Keung Woo, 1991. "Consumer Rationality and the Status Quo," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(1), pages 141-162.
    6. Dhar, Ravi, 1997. " Consumer Preference for a No-Choice Option," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 215-231, September.
    7. Samuelson, William & Zeckhauser, Richard, 1988. "Status Quo Bias in Decision Making," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 7-59, March.
    8. Adamowicz, Wiktor L. & Boxall, Peter C. & Williams, Michael & Louviere, Jordan, 1995. "Stated Preference Approaches for Measuring Passive Use Values: Choice Experiments versus Contingent Valuation," Staff Paper Series 24126, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
    9. Daniel McFadden & Kenneth Train, 2000. "Mixed MNL models for discrete response," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(5), pages 447-470.
    10. Beenstock, Michael & Goldin, Ephraim & Haitovsky, Yoel, 1998. "Response bias in a conjoint analysis of power outages," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 135-156, April.
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