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Food Demand In Mexico: A Quasi-Maximum Likelihood Approach

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  • Gould, Brian W.
  • Yen, Steven T.

Abstract

A growing trend in demand analysis during the last two decades is the use of household survey data. Detailed demographic information collected in these surveys allows treatment of heterogeneous preference and the typically large sample also allows estimation of large demand system that are otherwise not possible with aggregate time series. However, the use of household-level data is complicated by the censoring of the dependent variable especially for systems with disaggregated commodity definitions. To overcome the numerical problem of evaluating truncated multi-dimensional error term distributions, a Quasi-maximum likelihood method is used to estimate a censored 9-commodity demand system for a sample of urban Mexican households. The impacts of changes in price and expenditures are quantified as are the impacts of alternative household compositions evaluated via the use of an endogenously determined equivalence scale.

Suggested Citation

  • Gould, Brian W. & Yen, Steven T., 2002. "Food Demand In Mexico: A Quasi-Maximum Likelihood Approach," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19667, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea02:19667
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Jensen, Helen H., 2003. "Usefulness of Incomplete Demand Model in Censored Demand System Estimation," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 21923, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Jensen, Helen H. & Yan, Dong, 2005. "Household Welfare Cost of the Indonesian Macroeconomic Crisis," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19311, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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    Keywords

    Demand and Price Analysis;

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