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Cultural quotas in broadcasting I: a model

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  • Martin Richardson

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Abstract

This paper develops a Hotelling location model in which two radio stations choose combinations of local and international content to play, given consumers with preferences distributed over those combinations. Station revenue derives from sales of advertising time, the demand for which depends negatively on the price and positively on the station’s market share and consumers get disutility from advertising and from a less-than-ideal broadcast mix of local and international content. In this setting we show that the laissez-faire solution involves less than (socially optimal) maximal differentiation

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Richardson, 2004. "Cultural quotas in broadcasting I: a model," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2004-442, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:acb:cbeeco:2004-442
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    File URL: https://www.cbe.anu.edu.au/researchpapers/econ/wp442.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Richardson, 2004. "Cultural quotas in broadcasting II: policy," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2004-443, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    2. Anderson, S. P. & Neven, D. J., 1989. "Market efficiency with combinable products," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 707-719, April.
    3. Steven T. Berry & Joel Waldfogel, 1999. "Free Entry and Social Inefficiency in Radio Broadcasting," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 30(3), pages 397-420, Autumn.
    4. Simon P. Anderson & Stephen Coate, 2000. "Market Provision of Public Goods: The Case of Broadcasting," NBER Working Papers 7513, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Berry, Steven T. & Waldfogel, Joel, 1999. "Public radio in the United States: does it correct market failure or cannibalize commercial stations?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 189-211, February.
    6. Keith Acheson & Christopher Maule, 1990. "Canadian Content Rules: A Time for Reconsideration," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 16(3), pages 284-297, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Richardson, 2004. "Cultural quotas in broadcasting II: policy," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2004-443, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    2. Perona, Mathieu, 2010. "How Broadcasting Quotas Harm Program Diversity," MPRA Paper 19860, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Nela Filimon & Jordi López-Sintas & Carlos Padrós-Reig, 2011. "A test of Rosen’s and Adler’s theories of superstars," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 35(2), pages 137-161, May.
    4. Claude Crampes & Abraham Hollander, 2008. "The regulation of audiovisual content: quotas and conflicting objectives," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 195-219, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L59 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Other
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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