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Milestones of European Integration: Which matters most for Export Openness?

  • Robinson Kruse

    ()

    (Aarhus University, School of Economics and Management, CREATES)

  • Sanne Hiller

    (Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business, Aarhus University)

The European integration process has removed barriers to trade within Europe. We analyze which integration step has most profoundly influenced the trending behavior of export openness. We endogenously determine the single most decisive break in the trend, account for strong cross-country heterogeneity and propose a new measure for the strength of trend breaks. Highly open economies gain from both, monetary and real integration. In sharp contrast, less open economies do not benefit from real integration and even suffer from monetary integration. The major milestones for France, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands are the Euro introduction, the Maastricht Treaty, the Exchange Rate Mechanism I and the merge of EFTA and EEC to the European Economic Area, respectively. Our empirical results have important implications for inner-European economic development, as export openness feeds back into growth, unemployment and income convergence.

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Paper provided by School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus in its series CREATES Research Papers with number 2010-27.

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Length: 21
Date of creation: 01 Jul 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:aah:create:2010-27
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.au.dk/afn/

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  1. Gil-Pareja, Salvador & Llorca-Vivero, Rafael & Martinez-Serrano, Jose Antonio, 2007. "Did the European exchange-rate mechanism contribute to the integration of peripheral countries?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 303-308, May.
  2. Ben-David, Dan, 1995. "Trade and Convergence Among Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 1126, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Dan Ben-David & David H. Papell, 1997. "International Trade and Structural Change," NBER Working Papers 6096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Ben-David, Dan, 2001. "Trade liberalization and income convergence: a comment," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 229-234, October.
  5. Ben-David, Dan & Papell, David H., 1995. "The great wars, the great crash, and steady state growth: Some new evidence about an old stylized fact," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 453-475, December.
  6. Ben-David, Dan, 1993. "Equalizing Exchange: Trade Liberalization and Income Convergence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(3), pages 653-79, August.
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