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The Structure of Early Care and Education in the United States: Historical Evolution and International Comparisons

In: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 19

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  • Ann Dryden Witte
  • Marisol Trowbridge

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Ann Dryden Witte & Marisol Trowbridge, 2005. "The Structure of Early Care and Education in the United States: Historical Evolution and International Comparisons," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 19, pages 1-38, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:0163
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c0163.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Altshuler, Rosanne & Schwartz, Amy Ellen, 1996. "On the Progressivity of the Child Care Tax Credit: Snapshot Versus Time-Exposure Incidence," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 49(1), pages 55-71, March.
    2. Ruhm, Christopher J., 2000. "Parental leave and child health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 931-960, November.
    3. Pamela Loprest & Stefanie Schmidt & Ann Dryden Witte, 2000. "Welfare Reform under PRWORA: Aid to Children with Working Families?," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 14, pages 157-203, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Robert J. Lemke & Robert Witt & Ann Dryden White, 2007. "The Transition from Welfare to Work," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 33(3), pages 359-373, Summer.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies
    • H6 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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