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The evolving geography of the US motor vehicle industry

In: Handbook of Industry Studies and Economic Geography

Author

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  • Thomas Klier
  • James M. Rubenstein

Abstract

This unique Handbook examines the impacts on, and responses to, economic geography explicitly from the perspective of the behaviour, mechanics, systems and experiences of different firms in various types of industries. The industry studies approach allows the authors to explain why the economic geography of these different industries exhibits such particular and diverse characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Klier & James M. Rubenstein, 2013. "The evolving geography of the US motor vehicle industry," Chapters, in: Frank Giarratani & Geoffrey J.D. Hewings & Philip McCann (ed.),Handbook of Industry Studies and Economic Geography, chapter 2, pages 38-66, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:3542_2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas H. Klier & James M. Rubenstein, 2006. "Competition and trade in the U.S. auto parts sector," Chicago Fed Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Jan.
    2. Thomas H. Klier & William A. Testa, 2002. "Linkages across the border--the Great Lakes economy," Chicago Fed Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Jul.
    3. Klier, Thomas H., 2000. "Does "Just-in-time" Mean "Right-next-door"? Evidence from the Auto Industry on the Spatial Concentration of Supplier Networks," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 30(1), pages 1-17.
    4. Smith Jr. , Donald F. & Florida Richard, 1994. "Agglomeration and Industrial Location: An Econometric Analysis of Japanese-Affiliated Manufacturing Establishments in Automotive-Related Industries," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 23-41, July.
    5. Thomas Klier & James Rubenstein, 2008. "Who Really Made Your Car? Restructuring and Geographic change in the Auto Industry," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wrmyc, December.
    6. Timothy Sturgeon & Johannes Van Biesebroeck & Gary Gereffi, 2008. "Value chains, networks and clusters: reframing the global automotive industry," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(3), pages 297-321, May.
    7. Neil P. Hurley, 1959. "The Automotive Industry: A Study in Industrial Location," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(1), pages 1-14.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas H. Klier, 2015. "Auto Production Footprints: Comparing Europe and North America," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 101-119.

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