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Arms Trade Offsets: What Do We Know?

In: The Handbook on the Political Economy of War

Author

Listed:
  • Jurgen Brauer
  • John Paul Dunne

Abstract

By defining political economy and war in the broadest sense, this unique Handbook brings together a wide range of interdisciplinary scholars from economics, political science, sociology, and policy studies to address a multitude of important topics. These include an analysis of why wars begin, how wars are waged, what happens after war has ceased, and the various alternatives to war. Other sections explore civil war and revolution, the arms trade, economic and political systems, and post-conflict reconstruction and nation building. Policymakers as well as academics and students of political science, economics, public policy and sociology will find this volume to be an engaging and enlightening read.

Suggested Citation

  • Jurgen Brauer & John Paul Dunne, 2011. "Arms Trade Offsets: What Do We Know?," Chapters, in: Christopher J. Coyne & Rachel L. Mathers (ed.), The Handbook on the Political Economy of War, chapter 13, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13385_13
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781848442481.00022.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brauer, Jurgen, 2007. "Arms Industries, Arms Trade, and Developing Countries," Handbook of Defense Economics, in: Keith Hartley & Todd Sandler (ed.), Handbook of Defense Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 30, pages 973-1015, Elsevier.
    2. Jurgen Brauer, 2000. "Potential and actual arms production: Implications for the arms trade debate," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 461-480.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Florian Johannsen & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, "undated". "Political Determinants of the Extensive and Intensive Margins of International Arms Transfers," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 228, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    2. repec:epc:journl:v:12:y:2017:i:2:p:21-31 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Larrú, José María, 2013. "The developmental contribution of the Offset Agreements: the case of Colombia," MPRA Paper 51456, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Christopher Coyne, 2015. "Lobotomizing the defense brain," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 371-396, December.
    5. Vesa Kanniainen & Juha-Matti Lehtonen, 2019. "Offset Contracts as an Insurance Device in Building the National Security," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 85-97, January.

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