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Paul Tompkinson

Personal Details

First Name:Paul
Middle Name:
Last Name:Tompkinson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pto201
http://www.victoria.ac.nz/SEF/pages/staff/PaulTompkinson/index.aspx

Affiliation

School of Economics and Finance
Victoria Business School
Victoria University of Wellington

Wellington, New Zealand
http://www.vuw.ac.nz/sef/

: +64 (4) 463-5708
+64 (4) 495-5014
PO Box 600, Wellington 6140
RePEc:edi:egvuwnz (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Bethwaite, Judy & Tompkinson, Paul, 1996. "The ultimatum game and non-selfish utility functions," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 259-271, April.
  2. Tompkinson, Paul & Bethwaite, Judy, 1995. "The ultimatum game: raising the stakes," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 439-451, August.
  3. Tompkinson, Paul & Bethwaite, Judy, 1991. "The effect of information on fiscal preferences," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 287-298, June.
  4. Tompkinson, P & Philpott, B P, 1985. "Uncertainty in the Terms of Trade and the Optimal Structure of a Small Open Economy," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 12-18.
  5. Tompkinson, P, 1985. "Optimal Distortions for a Small Country Facing Random Prices," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(3), pages 520-524, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Bethwaite, Judy & Tompkinson, Paul, 1996. "The ultimatum game and non-selfish utility functions," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 259-271, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Frank, Bjorn, 1998. "Good news for experimenters: subjects do not care about your welfare," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 171-174, November.
    2. Handgraaf, Michel J. J. & van Dijk, Eric & Wilke, Henk A. M. & Vermunt, Riel C., 2003. "The salience of a recipient's alternatives: Inter- and intrapersonal comparison in ultimatum games," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 165-177, January.
    3. Thierry Vignolo, 2005. "When envy helps explain coordination," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 3(12), pages 1-7.
    4. Handgraaf, Michel J.J. & Dijk, Eric van & Wilke, Henk A.M. & Vermunt, Riel C., 2004. "Evaluability of outcomes in ultimatum bargaining," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 97-106, September.
    5. Aurélie Bonein, 2006. "An empirical study of determinants in decision-making process," Working Papers 06-10, LAMETA, Universtiy of Montpellier, revised Oct 2006.
    6. Deng, Lili & Tang, Wansheng & Zhang, Jianxiong, 2011. "The coevolutionary ultimatum game on different network topologies," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 390(23), pages 4227-4235.
    7. Dana, Jason & Cain, Daylian M. & Dawes, Robyn M., 2006. "What you don't know won't hurt me: Costly (but quiet) exit in dictator games," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 193-201, July.
    8. Nicolas Eber & Marc Willinger, 2004. "Are Athletes Different ? An Experimental Study Based on the Ultimatum Game," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2004-01, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg.

  2. Tompkinson, Paul & Bethwaite, Judy, 1995. "The ultimatum game: raising the stakes," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 439-451, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Joseph Henrich, 2000. "Does Culture Matter in Economic Behavior? Ultimatum Game Bargaining among the Machiguenga of the Peruvian Amazon," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 973-979, September.
    2. Hessel Oosterbeek & Randolph Sloof & Gijs van de Kuilen, 2004. "Cultural Differences in Ultimatum Game Experiments: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 7(2), pages 171-188, June.
    3. Emin Karagözoğlu & Ümit Barış Urhan, 2017. "The Effect of Stake Size in Experimental Bargaining and Distribution Games: A Survey," Group Decision and Negotiation, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 285-325, March.
    4. Bertrand Munier & Costin Zaharia, 2002. "High Stakes and Acceptance Behavior in Ultimatum Bargaining:," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 53(3), pages 187-207, November.
    5. Shen, Junyi & Takahashi, Hiromasa, 2013. "A cash effect in ultimatum game experiments," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 94-102.
    6. Rami Zwick & Xiao-Ping Chen, 1999. "What Price Fairness? A Bargaining Study," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 45(6), pages 804-823, June.
    7. Irlenbusch, Bernd, 2004. "Relying on a man's word?: An experimental study on non-binding contracts," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 299-332, September.
    8. Zhang, Yanling & Chen, Xiaojie & Liu, Aizhi & Sun, Changyin, 2018. "The effect of the stake size on the evolution of fairness," Applied Mathematics and Computation, Elsevier, vol. 321(C), pages 641-653.
    9. Stephane Mahuteau, 2002. "Reciprocal fairness and gift exchange practices in the labor," Labor and Demography 0211004, EconWPA.
    10. Nicolas Eber & Marc Willinger, 2004. "Are Athletes Different ? An Experimental Study Based on the Ultimatum Game," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2004-01, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg.

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