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Brian J. Meehan

Personal Details

First Name:Brian
Middle Name:J.
Last Name:Meehan
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pme661

Affiliation

Economics Department
Berry College

Mount Berry, Georgia (United States)
http://www.berry.edu/academics/campbell/economics/

:


RePEc:edi:edberus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Brian J Meehan & Edward Timmons & Andrew Meehan & Ilya Kukaev, 2019. "The effects of growth in occupational licensing on intergenerational mobility," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(2), pages 1516-1528.
  2. Blackstone, Erwin A. & Hakim, Simon & Meehan, Brian, 2017. "A regional, market oriented governance for disaster management: A new planning approach," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 57-68.
  3. Brian Meehan & Bruce L. Benson, 2017. "Does private security affect crime?: a test using state regulations as instruments," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(48), pages 4911-4924, October.
  4. Brian Meehan, 2017. "Do Economies of Scale Exist in Private Protection? Evaluating Nozick's "Invisible Hand"," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 32(Summer 20), pages 83-91.
  5. Meehan, Brian, 2015. "The impact of licensing requirements on industrial organization and labor: Evidence from the U.S. private security market," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 113-121.
  6. Brian Meehan & Bruce Benson, 2015. "The occupations of regulators influence occupational regulation: evidence from the US private security industry," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(1), pages 97-117, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Brian Meehan & Bruce L. Benson, 2017. "Does private security affect crime?: a test using state regulations as instruments," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(48), pages 4911-4924, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Bruce L. Benson, 2015. "Regulation As a Barrier to Market Provision and to Innovation: The Case of Toll Roads and Steam Carriages in England," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 30(Spring 20), pages 61-87.
    2. Brian Meehan & Bruce Benson, 2015. "The occupations of regulators influence occupational regulation: evidence from the US private security industry," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(1), pages 97-117, January.
    3. Brian Meehan, 2017. "Do Economies of Scale Exist in Private Protection? Evaluating Nozick's "Invisible Hand"," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 32(Summer 20), pages 83-91.
    4. Luis Raúl Rodríguez-Reyes, 2018. "A Model of the Indirect Effect of Crime on the Demand for Money," Remef - The Mexican Journal of Economics and Finance, Instituto Mexicano de Ejecutivos de Finanzas. Remef, vol. 13(4), pages 571-584, Octubre-D.

  2. Brian Meehan, 2017. "Do Economies of Scale Exist in Private Protection? Evaluating Nozick's "Invisible Hand"," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 32(Summer 20), pages 83-91.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Makovi, 2019. "Government vs. Governance: Libertarianism and Private Communities," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 34(Spring 20), pages 39-57.

  3. Meehan, Brian, 2015. "The impact of licensing requirements on industrial organization and labor: Evidence from the U.S. private security market," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 113-121.

    Cited by:

    1. Brian Meehan, 2017. "Do Economies of Scale Exist in Private Protection? Evaluating Nozick's "Invisible Hand"," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 32(Summer 20), pages 83-91.
    2. Dick M. Carpenter & Lisa Knepper & Kyle Sweetland & Jennifer McDonald, 2018. "The Continuing Burden of Occupational Licensing in the United States," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(3), pages 380-405, October.
    3. Brian J Meehan & Edward Timmons & Andrew Meehan & Ilya Kukaev, 2019. "The effects of growth in occupational licensing on intergenerational mobility," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 39(2), pages 1516-1528.

  4. Brian Meehan & Bruce Benson, 2015. "The occupations of regulators influence occupational regulation: evidence from the US private security industry," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(1), pages 97-117, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Meehan, Brian, 2015. "The impact of licensing requirements on industrial organization and labor: Evidence from the U.S. private security market," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 113-121.
    2. Lucas, David & Boudreaux, Christopher, 2018. "Federal Regulation, Job Creation, and the Moderating Effect of State Economic Freedom," MPRA Paper 92593, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Brian Meehan, 2017. "Do Economies of Scale Exist in Private Protection? Evaluating Nozick's "Invisible Hand"," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 32(Summer 20), pages 83-91.
    4. Sounman Hong & Jeehun Lim, 2016. "Capture and the bureaucratic mafia: does the revolving door erode bureaucratic integrity?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 166(1), pages 69-86, January.
    5. David S. Lucas & Christopher J. Boudreaux, 2019. "The Interdependence of Hierarchical Institutions: Federal Regulation, Job Creation, and the Moderating Effect of State Economic Freedom," Papers 1903.02924, arXiv.org.
    6. Sounman Hong & Taek Kyu Kim, 2017. "Regulatory capture in agency performance evaluation: industry expertise versus revolving-door lobbying," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 171(1), pages 167-186, April.
    7. Christopher John Boudreaux, 2015. "Democratic age and the size of governmen," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(3), pages 1531-1542.

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