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Jason Cannon Jones

Personal Details

First Name:Jason
Middle Name:Cannon
Last Name:Jones
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pjo363

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Furman University

Greenville, South Carolina (United States)
http://economics.furman.edu/




RePEc:edi:ecfurus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Tyler Bowles & Jason Jones, 2002. "An Analysis of the Effectiveness of supplemental Instruction: The Problem of Selection Bias and Limited Dependent Variables," Working Papers 2002-14, Utah State University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Jason Jones & Matthew Deininger & Samikshya Pandey, 2019. "Response and Recovery: Does the Delay Between a Crisis and an IMF Loan Affect the Length of Recovery?," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 25(4), pages 481-482, November.
  2. Bebonchu Atems & Jason Jones, 2015. "Income inequality and economic growth: a panel VAR approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1541-1561, June.
  3. Nathaniel P.S. Cook & Jason Cannon Jones, 2015. "The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and export diversification," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(7), pages 947-967, October.
  4. Jason Jones, 2013. "Cross-Border Banking in the Expanded European Union," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(6), pages 54-74, November.
  5. Jason Jones & Nora Collins & Lauren Sribnick, 2012. "External Influences on Business Cycle Synchronization in the Euro Area," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 18(1), pages 28-39, February.
  6. Jason Jones & Mark Witte, 2011. "Financial Integration and Business Cycle Synchronization in the Expanded EU," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 39(1), pages 99-100, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Tyler Bowles & Jason Jones, 2002. "An Analysis of the Effectiveness of supplemental Instruction: The Problem of Selection Bias and Limited Dependent Variables," Working Papers 2002-14, Utah State University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael J. Enz & James E. Tierney, 2016. "Advice on Implementing Supplemental Instruction in an Introductory Level Economics Course," Journal of Economics Teaching, Journal of Economics Teaching, vol. 1(2), pages 111-117, December.

Articles

  1. Bebonchu Atems & Jason Jones, 2015. "Income inequality and economic growth: a panel VAR approach," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1541-1561, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Luigi Mastronardi & Aurora Cavallo, 2020. "The Spatial Dimension of Income Inequality: An Analysis at Municipal Level," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(4), pages 1-18, February.
    2. Atems, Bebonchu, 2019. "The effects of government spending shocks: Evidence from U.S. states," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 65-80.
    3. Francesco Grigoli & Evelio Paredes & Gabriel Di Bella, 2016. "Inequality and Growth; A Heterogeneous Approach," IMF Working Papers 16/244, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Kufenko, Vadim & Geloso, Vincent, 2019. "Who are the champions? Inequality, economic freedom and the olympics," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 13-2019, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    5. Kyungmin Kim, 2020. "Income inequality and house prices in the United States: A panel VAR analysis," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 40(3), pages 2111-2120.
    6. Nikos Benos & Stelios Karagiannis, 2018. "Inequality And Growth In The United States: Why Physical And Human Capital Matter," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(1), pages 572-619, January.
    7. Atems, Bebonchu, 2018. "Regional heterogeneity in the relationship between inequality and growth: Evidence from panel vector autoregressions," The Journal of Economic Asymmetries, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 41-47.
    8. David Castells-Quintana & Raul Ramos & Vicente Royuela, 2015. "Income inequality in European Regions: Recent trends and determinants," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 35(2), pages 123-146, October.
    9. Robert Calvert Jump, 2018. "Inequality And Aggregate Demand In The Is‐Lm And Is‐Mp Models," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(3), pages 269-276, July.
    10. Vicente German-Soto & Chapa Cantú, 2015. "Cointegration with structural changes between per capita product and income inequality in Mexico," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(49), pages 5215-5228, October.
    11. Cheratian, Iman & Goltabar, Saleh, 2017. "Energy Consumption and Regional Economic Growth: The Case of Iranian Manufacturing Sector," MPRA Paper 78315, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Ryan H. Murphy & Colin O’Reilly, 2019. "Applying panel vector autoregression to institutions, human capital, and output," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 57(5), pages 1633-1652, November.
    13. Bebonchu Atems & Grayden Shand, 2018. "An empirical analysis of the relationship between entrepreneurship and income inequality," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 51(4), pages 905-922, December.
    14. Deininger, Sebastian & Maringer, Dietmar, 2017. "Channels of Sovereign Risk Spillovers and Investment in the Manufacturing Sector," Working papers 2017/07, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
    15. Dong, Xiao-Ying & Hao, Yu, 2018. "Would income inequality affect electricity consumption? Evidence from China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 215-227.

  2. Nathaniel P.S. Cook & Jason Cannon Jones, 2015. "The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and export diversification," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(7), pages 947-967, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Dalibor Gottwald & Libor Švadlenka & Hana Pavlisová, 2016. "Human Capital and Growth of E-postal Services: A cross-country Analysis in Developing Countries," Post-Print hal-01307145, HAL.
    2. Temprano Arroyo, Heliodoro, 2018. "Promoting labour market integration of refugees with trade preferences: Beyond the EU-Jordan compact," Kiel Working Papers 2108, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Kinfack, Emilie & Bonga-Bonga, Lumengo, 2020. "Trade Linkages and Business Cycle Co-movement: Analysis of Trade between African Economies and their Main Trading partners," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 73(2), pages 275-306.
    4. Mullings, Robert & Mahabir, Aruneema, 2018. "Growth by Destination: The Role of Trade in Africa’s Recent Growth Episode," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 243-261.
    5. Nicola Coniglio & Davide Vurchio & Nicola Cantore & Michele Clara, 2018. "On the evolution of comparative advantage: path-dependent versus path-defying changes," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1818, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Apr 2018.

  3. Jason Jones & Nora Collins & Lauren Sribnick, 2012. "External Influences on Business Cycle Synchronization in the Euro Area," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 18(1), pages 28-39, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Simon Voigts, 2014. "Why the split of payroll taxation between firms and workers matters for macroeconomic stability," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2014-061, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

  4. Jason Jones & Mark Witte, 2011. "Financial Integration and Business Cycle Synchronization in the Expanded EU," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 39(1), pages 99-100, March.

    Cited by:

    1. N. Antonakakis & G. Tondl, 2014. "Does integration and economic policy coordination promote business cycle synchronization in the EU?," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 41(3), pages 541-575, August.
    2. Igor Velickovski & Aleksandar Stojkov & Ivana Rajkovic, 2017. "DIS Union of the Core and the Periphery," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(6), pages 159-174.

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