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Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley

Personal Details

First Name:Nadia
Middle Name:
Last Name:Greenhalgh-Stanley
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgr425
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.kent.edu/business/economics/~ngreenha/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
College of Business Administration
Kent State University

Kent, Ohio (United States)
http://www.kent.edu/business/economics


(330) 672-2366
P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001
RePEc:edi:dekenus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Melissa Gentry & Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley & Shawn M. Rohlin & Jeffrey P. Thompson, 2020. "Dynamic Sales Tax Competition: Evidence from Panel Data at the Border," Working Papers 20-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  2. Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley, 2012. "Can the Government Incentivize the Purchase of Private Long-Term Care Insurance? Evidence from the Long-Term Care Partnership Program," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2012-14, Center for Retirement Research, revised May 2012.
  3. Gary V. Engelhardt & Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley, 2008. "Public Long-Term Care Insurance and the Housing and Living Arrangements of the Elderly: Evidence from Medicare Home Health Benefits," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2008-15, Center for Retirement Research, revised Dec 2008.

Articles

  1. Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley, 2015. "Are the Elderly Responsive in Their Savings Behavior to Changes in Asset Limits for Medicaid?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 43(3), pages 324-346, May.
  2. Eriksen, Michael D. & Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia & Engelhardt, Gary V., 2015. "Home safety, accessibility, and elderly health: Evidence from falls," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 14-24.
  3. Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley, 2014. "Can the government incentivize the purchase of private long-term care insurance? Evidence from the Partnership for Long-Term Care," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(8), pages 541-544, May.
  4. Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley & Shawn Rohlin, 2013. "How Does Bankruptcy Law Impact the Elderly's Business and Housing Decisions?," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56(2), pages 417-451.
  5. Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia, 2012. "Medicaid and the housing and asset decisions of the elderly: Evidence from estate recovery programs," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 210-224.
  6. Engelhardt, Gary V. & Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia, 2010. "Home health care and the housing and living arrangements of the elderly," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 226-238, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley, 2015. "Are the Elderly Responsive in Their Savings Behavior to Changes in Asset Limits for Medicaid?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 43(3), pages 324-346, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Jing Dong & Fabrice Smieliauskas & R. Tamara Konetzka, 2019. "Effects of long-term care insurance on financial well-being," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 44(2), pages 277-302, April.

  2. Eriksen, Michael D. & Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia & Engelhardt, Gary V., 2015. "Home safety, accessibility, and elderly health: Evidence from falls," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 14-24.

    Cited by:

    1. I-Ming Feng & Jun-Hong Chen & Bo-Wei Zhu & Lei Xiong, 2018. "Assessment of and Improvement Strategies for the Housing of Healthy Elderly: Improving Quality of Life," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(3), pages 1-32, March.
    2. Sewin Chan & Andrew F. Haughwout & Joseph Tracy, 2015. "How mortgage finance affects the urban landscape," Staff Reports 713, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. Adriana Luciano & Federica Pascale & Francesco Polverino & Alison Pooley, 2020. "Measuring Age-Friendly Housing: A Framework," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-35, January.

  3. Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley, 2014. "Can the government incentivize the purchase of private long-term care insurance? Evidence from the Partnership for Long-Term Care," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(8), pages 541-544, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Bergquist, Savannah & Costa-Font, Joan & Swartz, Katherine, 2018. "Long-term care partnerships: Are they fit for purpose?," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 151-158.
    2. Savannah Bergquist & Joan Costa-i-Font & Katherine Swartz, 2015. "Long Term Care Partnerships: Are they 'Fit for Purpose'?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5155, CESifo.

  4. Nadia Greenhalgh-Stanley & Shawn Rohlin, 2013. "How Does Bankruptcy Law Impact the Elderly's Business and Housing Decisions?," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56(2), pages 417-451.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric Helland & Anupam B. Jena & Dan P. Ly & Seth A. Seabury, 2016. "Self-insuring against Liability Risk: Evidence from Physician Home Values in States with Unlimited Homestead Exemptions," NBER Working Papers 22031, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Benjamin B Boozer & S. Keith Lowe & Robert J. Landry III, 2014. "Personal Financial Decisions: A Study of Changes in Homestead Exemption Levels and Consumer Bankruptcy Choices," The International Journal of Business and Finance Research, The Institute for Business and Finance Research, vol. 8(4), pages 17-26.

  5. Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia, 2012. "Medicaid and the housing and asset decisions of the elderly: Evidence from estate recovery programs," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 210-224.

    Cited by:

    1. James M. Poterba & Steven F. Venti & David A. Wise, 2011. "The Composition and Draw-down of Wealth in Retirement," NBER Working Papers 17536, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. David Slusky & Donna Ginther, 2017. "Did Medicaid Expansion Reduce Medical Divorce?," NBER Working Papers 23139, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lee, Daeyong, 2019. "Effects of the Medicaid expansion on low-income, childless household savings: Evidence from the Affordable Care Act," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 181(C), pages 164-168.

  6. Engelhardt, Gary V. & Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia, 2010. "Home health care and the housing and living arrangements of the elderly," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 226-238, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Collins, J. Michael & Hembre, Erik & Urban, Carly, 2020. "Exploring the rise of mortgage borrowing among older Americans," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C).
    2. Eriksen, Michael D. & Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia & Engelhardt, Gary V., 2015. "Home safety, accessibility, and elderly health: Evidence from falls," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 14-24.
    3. Greenhalgh-Stanley, Nadia, 2012. "Medicaid and the housing and asset decisions of the elderly: Evidence from estate recovery programs," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 210-224.
    4. Chiara Orsini, 2019. "The mortality effects of changing public funding for home health care: An empirical analysis of Medicare home health care in the United States," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(7), pages 921-936, July.
    5. Li, Lixing & Wu, Xiaoyu, 2019. "Housing price and intergenerational co-residence in urban China," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-1.
    6. Erin Hye-Won Kim, 2015. "Public transfers and living alone among the elderly," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(50), pages 1383-1408.
    7. Daichun Yi & Xiaoying Deng & Gang-Zhi Fan & Seow Eng Ong, 2018. "House Price and co-Residence with Older Parents: Evidence from China," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 57(3), pages 502-533, October.
    8. Joan Costa-i-Font, 2017. ""Institutionalization Aversion" and the Willingness to Pay for Home Health Care," CESifo Working Paper Series 6703, CESifo.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2020-09-07
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2020-09-07

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