IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pch581.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Binkai Chen

Personal Details

First Name:Binkai
Middle Name:
Last Name:Chen
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pch581
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

China Center for Economic Research (CCER)
Peking University

Beijing, China
http://www.nsd.pku.edu.cn/
RePEc:edi:ccpkucn (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Binkai Chen & Ming Lu & Ninghua Zhong, 2012. "Hukou and Consumption Heterogeneity: Migrants' Expenditure Is Depressed by Institutional Constraints in Urban China," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd11-221, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

Articles

  1. Justin Lin & Binkai Chen, 2011. "Urbanization and urban-rural inequality in china: a new perspective from the government’s development strategy," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, vol. 6(1), pages 1-21, March.
  2. Binkai Chen & Yang Yao, 2011. "The Cursed Virtue: Government Infrastructural Investment and Household Consumption in Chinese Provinces," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 73, pages 856-877, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Binkai Chen & Ming Lu & Ninghua Zhong, 2012. "Hukou and Consumption Heterogeneity: Migrants' Expenditure Is Depressed by Institutional Constraints in Urban China," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd11-221, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Zhao & Lu, Ming & Xu, Le, 2014. "Returns to dialect," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 27-43.
    2. Nguyen, Giang, 2018. "Consumption behavior of migrant households in Vietnam: Remittances, duration of stay, and the household registration system," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1-12.
    3. Ge, Suqin & Yang, Dennis T. & Zhang, Junsen, 2012. "Population Policies, Demographic Structural Changes, and the Chinese Household Saving Puzzle," IZA Discussion Papers 7026, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Massimiliano Tani, 2017. "Hukou Changes and Subjective Well-Being in China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 47-61, May.
    5. Tani, Massimiliano, 2015. "Hukou Changes and Subjective Well-Being," IZA Discussion Papers 9451, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Eric Fong & Hang Yue Ngo, 2016. "Unemployment patterns of local-born and immigrant youth in Hong Kong," Journal of Population Research, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 243-261, September.

Articles

  1. Justin Lin & Binkai Chen, 2011. "Urbanization and urban-rural inequality in china: a new perspective from the government’s development strategy," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, vol. 6(1), pages 1-21, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Jing Li & Tsun Se Cheong & Jianfa Shen & Dahai Fu, 2019. "Urbanization And Rural–Urban Consumption Disparity: Evidence From China," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 64(04), pages 983-996, September.
    2. Wenli Cheng & Yongzheng Wu & CEMA & College of Mathematics and Computer Science, Hunan Normal University, 2014. "Understanding the Kuznets Process: An Empirical Investigation of Income Inequality in China 1978-2011," Monash Economics Working Papers 12-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    3. Wang, Xiang & Shao, Shuai & Li, Ling, 2019. "Agricultural inputs, urbanization, and urban-rural income disparity: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 67-84.
    4. Brasili, Cristina & Barone, Barbara & Bin, Peng, 2014. "Regional Disparity of Vulnerability to Food Insecurity in China," 2014 Third Congress, June 25-27, 2014, Alghero, Italy 173107, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
    5. Wang, Siliang & Tan, Shukui & Yang, Shengfu & Lin, Qiaowen & Zhang, Lu, 2019. "Urban-biased land development policy and the urban-rural income gap: Evidence from Hubei Province, China," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 87(C).

  2. Binkai Chen & Yang Yao, 2011. "The Cursed Virtue: Government Infrastructural Investment and Household Consumption in Chinese Provinces," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 73, pages 856-877, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Guillaume Gaulier & Françoise Lemoine & Deniz Ünal, 2011. "China's Foreign Trade in the Perspective of a More Balanced Economic Growth," Working Papers 2011-03, CEPII research center.
    2. Françoise Lemoine & Deniz Ünal, 2012. "Scanning the Ups and Downs of China’s Trade Imbalances," Working Papers 2012-14, CEPII research center.
    3. Yang Yao & Muyang Zhang, 2015. "Subnational leaders and economic growth: evidence from Chinese cities," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(4), pages 405-436, December.
    4. Yao, Yang, 2014. "The Chinese Growth Miracle," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 7, pages 943-1031, Elsevier.
    5. Jianwei Xu & Panpan Yang & Guangrong Ma, 2017. "Accounting for China's Saving-Investment Imbalance from 2002–2008," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(2), pages 234-252, June.
    6. Chang, Xiao & An, Tongliang & Tam, Pui Sun & Gu, Xinhua, 2020. "National savings rate and sectoral income distribution: An empirical look at China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C).
    7. Dang, Dandan & Fang, Hongsheng & He, Minyuan, 2019. "Economic policy uncertainty, tax quotas and corporate tax burden: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 1-1.
    8. Samuel Cudré, 2014. "Capital’s long march west: saving and investment frictions in Chinese regions," ECON - Working Papers 161, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    9. He, Xiaobo, 2013. "Wages and Access to International Markets: Evidence from Urban China," MPRA Paper 44537, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Hallonsten, Jan Simon & Ziesemer, Thomas, 2016. "A semi-endogenous growth model for developing countries with public factors, imported capital goods, and limited export demand," MERIT Working Papers 2016-004, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2012-03-08
  2. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2012-03-08
  3. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (1) 2012-03-08
  4. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2012-03-08

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Binkai Chen should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.