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Mingyu Chen

Personal Details

First Name:Mingyu
Middle Name:
Last Name:Chen
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pch1107
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Industrial Relations Section
Department of Economics
Princeton University

Princeton, New Jersey (United States)
http://www.irs.princeton.edu/

: 609 258-4041
609 258-2907
Firestone Library, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-2098
RePEc:edi:irprius (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Charles M. Becker & Cecilia Elena Rouse & Mingyu Chen, 2014. "Can a Summer Make a Difference? The Impact of the American Economic Association Summer Program on Minority Student Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 20407, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Maria E. Canon & Mingyu Chen & Elise Marifian, 2013. "Labor mismatch in the Great Recession: a review of indexes using recent U.S. data," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 237-272.
  2. Chen, Mingyu & Wolla, Scott A., 2012. "“Dewey defeats Truman”: be aware of data revisions," Page One Economics Newsletter, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue apr, pages 1-3, April.
  3. Yi Wen & Mingyu Chen, 2012. "Okun’s law: a meaningful guide for monetary policy?," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  4. Maria E. Canon & Mingyu Chen, 2011. "The mismatch between job openings and job seekers," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue July, pages 10-11.
  5. Mingyu Chen & Yi Wen, 2011. "RMB appreciation and U.S. inflation risk," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  6. Mingyu Chen & Yi Wen, 2011. "Oil price shocks and inflation risk," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Maria E. Canon & Mingyu Chen & Elise Marifian, 2013. "Labor mismatch in the Great Recession: a review of indexes using recent U.S. data," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 237-272.

    Cited by:

    1. Hutter, Christian & Weber, Enzo, 2014. "Forecasting with a mismatch-enhanced labor market matching function," IAB Discussion Paper 201416, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    2. Hugo Erken & Eric Loon & Wouter Verbeek, 2015. "Mismatch on the Dutch Labour Market in the Great Recession," De Economist, Springer, vol. 163(4), pages 435-459, December.
    3. Christian Hutter & Enzo Weber, 2017. "Mismatch and the Forecasting Performance of Matching Functions," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 79(1), pages 101-123, February.
    4. Hugo Erken & Eric van Loon & Wouter Verbeek, 2015. "Mismatch on the Dutch labour market in the Great Recession," CPB Discussion Paper 303, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

  2. Yi Wen & Mingyu Chen, 2012. "Okun’s law: a meaningful guide for monetary policy?," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

    Cited by:

    1. Raymond Hawkins, 2015. "Okun’s law and anelastic relaxation in economics," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 10(1), pages 151-161, April.
    2. Michael T. Owyang & E. Katarina Vermann, 2013. "Okun's law in recession and recovery," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

  3. Maria E. Canon & Mingyu Chen, 2011. "The mismatch between job openings and job seekers," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue July, pages 10-11.

    Cited by:

    1. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Fernando Rios-Avila, 2012. "A closer look at nonparticipants during and after the Great Recession," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2012-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

  4. Mingyu Chen & Yi Wen, 2011. "Oil price shocks and inflation risk," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

    Cited by:

    1. Sek, Siok Kun, 2017. "Impact of oil price changes on domestic price inflation at disaggregated levels: Evidence from linear and nonlinear ARDL modeling," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 204-217.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2014-09-05. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2014-09-05. Author is listed

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