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Nicole Black

Personal Details

First Name:Nicole
Middle Name:
Last Name:Black
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbl204
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree:2012 Centre for Health Economics; Monash Business School; Monash University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Centre for Health Economics
Monash Business School
Monash University

Melbourne, Australia
http://business.monash.edu/centre-for-health-economics

+61 3 9905 0733
+61 3 9905 8344
Building 75, VIC, 3800
RePEc:edi:chmonau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Nicole Black & Elaine De Gruyter & Dennis Petrie & Sarah Smith, 2020. "Altruism born of suffering? The impact of an adverse health shock on pro-social behaviour," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 20/736, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  2. Knott, R. & Lorgelly, P. & Black, N. & Hollingsworth, B., 2016. "Differential item functioning in the EQ-5D: An exploratory analysis using anchoring vignettes," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/14, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  3. Au, N. & Johnston, D. W., 2013. "An econometric analysis of self-assessed health: what does it mean and what is it hiding?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 13/31, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

Articles

  1. Nicole Black & Sonja C. de New, 2020. "Short, Heavy and Underrated? Teacher Assessment Biases by Children's Body Size," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 82(5), pages 961-987, October.
  2. Elaine de Gruyter & Dennis Petrie & Nicole Black & Philip Gharghori, 2020. "Attracting investors for public health programmes with Social Impact Bonds," Public Money & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(3), pages 225-236, April.
  3. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael A., 2019. "The effect of school sports facilities on physical activity, health and socioeconomic status in adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 220(C), pages 120-128.
  4. Black, Nicole & Hughes, Robert & Jones, Andrew M., 2018. "The health care costs of childhood obesity in Australia: An instrumental variables approach," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 1-13.
  5. Nicole Black & Sonja C. Kassenboehmer, 2017. "Getting Weighed Down: The Effect of Childhood Obesity on the Development of Socioemotional Skills," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(2), pages 263-295.
  6. Knott, Rachel J. & Lorgelly, Paula K. & Black, Nicole & Hollingsworth, Bruce, 2017. "Differential item functioning in quality of life measurement: An analysis using anchoring vignettes," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 190(C), pages 247-255.
  7. Rachel J. Knott & Nicole Black & Bruce Hollingsworth & Paula K. Lorgelly, 2017. "Response‐Scale Heterogeneity in the EQ‐5D," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 387-394, March.
  8. Rachel J. Knott & Nicole Black & Bruce Hollingsworth & Paula K. Lorgelly, 2017. "Response to comment by robone: Practical advice for the implementation of anchoring vignettes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 398-400, March.
  9. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Justification bias in self-reported disability: New evidence from panel data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 124-134.
  10. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Who provides inconsistent reports of their health status? The importance of age, cognitive ability and socioeconomic status," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 191(C), pages 9-18.
  11. Nicole Black & David W. Johnston & Anna Peeters, 2015. "Childhood Obesity and Cognitive Achievement," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(9), pages 1082-1100, September.
  12. Nicole Au & David W. Johnston, 2015. "Too Much of a Good Thing? Exploring the Impact of Wealth on Weight," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(11), pages 1403-1421, November.
  13. Au, Nicole & Johnston, David W., 2014. "Self-assessed health: What does it mean and what does it hide?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 21-28.
  14. Nicole Au & Bruce Hollingsworth & Jean Spinks, 2014. "Measuring the Efficiency of Health Services in Lower-income Countries: The Case of Papua New Guinea," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(2), pages 259-272, March.
  15. N. Au & K. Hauck & B. Hollingsworth, 2013. "The relationship between smoking, quitting smoking and obesity in Australia: a seemingly unrelated probit approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(16), pages 2191-2199, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Knott, R. & Lorgelly, P. & Black, N. & Hollingsworth, B., 2016. "Differential item functioning in the EQ-5D: An exploratory analysis using anchoring vignettes," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/14, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 11th September 2017
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2017-09-11 16:00:01

Working papers

  1. Knott, R. & Lorgelly, P. & Black, N. & Hollingsworth, B., 2016. "Differential item functioning in the EQ-5D: An exploratory analysis using anchoring vignettes," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/14, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    Cited by:

    1. Rachel J. Knott & Nicole Black & Bruce Hollingsworth & Paula K. Lorgelly, 2017. "Response to comment by robone: Practical advice for the implementation of anchoring vignettes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 398-400, March.

  2. Au, N. & Johnston, D. W., 2013. "An econometric analysis of self-assessed health: what does it mean and what is it hiding?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 13/31, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicole Au & David W. Johnston, 2015. "Too Much of a Good Thing? Exploring the Impact of Wealth on Weight," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(11), pages 1403-1421, November.
    2. Mujcic, Redzo, 2014. "Are fruit and vegetables good for our mental and physical health? Panel data evidence from Australia," MPRA Paper 59149, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Nicole Black & Sonja C. Kassenboehmer, 2017. "Getting Weighed Down: The Effect of Childhood Obesity on the Development of Socioemotional Skills," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(2), pages 263-295.

    Cited by:

    1. Rosemary Elkins & Stefanie Schurer, 2018. "Exploring the role of fathers in non-cognitive skill development over the lifecourse," Working Papers 2018-034, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Gaitz, Jason & Schurer, Stefanie, 2017. "Bonus Skills: Examining the Effect of an Unconditional Cash Transfer on Child Human Capital Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 10525, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Elkins, Rosemary & Schurer, Stefanie, 2018. "Exploring the Role of Fathers in Non-Cognitive Skill Development over the Lifecourse," IZA Discussion Papers 11451, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Rosemary Elkins & Stefanie Schurer, 2020. "Exploring the role of parental engagement in non-cognitive skill development over the lifecourse," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 33(3), pages 957-1004, July.

  2. Knott, Rachel J. & Lorgelly, Paula K. & Black, Nicole & Hollingsworth, Bruce, 2017. "Differential item functioning in quality of life measurement: An analysis using anchoring vignettes," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 190(C), pages 247-255.

    Cited by:

    1. Irvin L Ong & Michael Joseph S Diño & Maria Minerva P Calimag & Fe A Hidalgo, 2019. "Development and validation of interprofessional learning assessment tool for health professionals in continuing professional development (CPD)," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(1), pages 1-16, January.
    2. Hana Vonkova, 2019. "Life Satisfaction among Different Groups of Children: Self-Reports, Differential Scale Usage and Anchoring Vignettes," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 12(6), pages 2111-2136, December.
    3. Harris, Mark N. & Knott, Rachel J. & Lorgelly, Paula K. & Rice, Nigel, 2020. "Using externally collected vignettes to account for reporting heterogeneity in survey self-assessment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 194(C).

  3. Rachel J. Knott & Nicole Black & Bruce Hollingsworth & Paula K. Lorgelly, 2017. "Response‐Scale Heterogeneity in the EQ‐5D," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 387-394, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Knott, R. & Lorgelly, P. & Black, N. & Hollingsworth, B., 2016. "Differential item functioning in the EQ-5D: An exploratory analysis using anchoring vignettes," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/14, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Rachel J. Knott & Nicole Black & Bruce Hollingsworth & Paula K. Lorgelly, 2017. "Response to comment by robone: Practical advice for the implementation of anchoring vignettes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 398-400, March.
    3. Silvana Robone, 2017. "Comment on ‘Response –scale heterogeneity in the EQ‐5D: Can we use vignettes to address response‐scale heterogeneity in the EQ‐5D? Not if but how’," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 395-397, March.
    4. Harris, Mark N. & Knott, Rachel J. & Lorgelly, Paula K. & Rice, Nigel, 2020. "Using externally collected vignettes to account for reporting heterogeneity in survey self-assessment," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 194(C).
    5. Devlin, N. & Lorgelly, P. & Herdman, M., 2019. "Can We Really Compare and Aggregate PRO Data Between People and Settings? Implications for Multi-Country Clinical Trials and HTA," Research Papers 002094, Office of Health Economics.

  4. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Justification bias in self-reported disability: New evidence from panel data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 124-134.

    Cited by:

    1. Rose, Liam, 2020. "Retirement and health: Evidence from England," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    2. Yuda, Michio, 2020. "Childhood health and future outcomes: Evidence from panel surveys for the Japanese population," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C).
    3. Gibson, Grant & Clair, Luc, 2019. "O brother how art thou: Propensity to report self-assessed unmet need," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 243(C).
    4. Katie M. Jajtner & Sophie Mitra & Christine Fountain & Austin Nichols, 2020. "Rising Income Inequality Through a Disability Lens: Trends in the United States 1981–2018," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 151(1), pages 81-114, August.
    5. Syed Afroz Keramat & Khorshed Alam & Jeff Gow & Stuart J H Biddle, 2020. "Gender differences in the longitudinal association between obesity, and disability with workplace absenteeism in the Australian working population," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(5), pages 1-14, May.

  5. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Who provides inconsistent reports of their health status? The importance of age, cognitive ability and socioeconomic status," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 191(C), pages 9-18.

    Cited by:

    1. Nesson, Erik T. & Robinson, Joshua J., 2019. "On the measurement of health and its effect on the measurement of health inequality," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 207-221.
    2. Perales, Francisco, 2018. "The cognitive roots of prejudice towards same-sex couples: An analysis of an Australian national sample," Intelligence, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 117-127.

  6. Nicole Black & David W. Johnston & Anna Peeters, 2015. "Childhood Obesity and Cognitive Achievement," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(9), pages 1082-1100, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicole Black & Sonja C. de New, 2020. "Short, Heavy and Underrated? Teacher Assessment Biases by Children's Body Size," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 82(5), pages 961-987, October.
    2. Steven Bednar & Kathryn Rouse, 2020. "The effect of physical education on children's body weight and human capital: New evidence from the ECLS‐K:2011," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(4), pages 393-405, April.
    3. Lv, Bo & Lv, Lijie & Bai, Chuanliang & Luo, Liang, 2020. "Body mass index and academic achievement in Chinese elementary students: The mediating role of peer acceptance," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 108(C).

  7. Nicole Au & David W. Johnston, 2015. "Too Much of a Good Thing? Exploring the Impact of Wealth on Weight," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(11), pages 1403-1421, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Charles Courtemanche & James Marton & Benjamin Ukert & Aaron Yelowitz & Daniela Zapata, 2017. "Early Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Health Care Access, Risky Health Behaviors, and Self-Assessed Health," NBER Working Papers 23269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kettlewell, Nathan, 2018. "Risk preference dynamics around life events," Working Papers 2018-07, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
    3. Mendolia, Silvia & McNamee, Paul & Yerokhin, Oleg, 2018. "The Transmission of Mental Health within Households: Does One Partner's Mental Health Influence the Other Partner's Life Satisfaction?," IZA Discussion Papers 11431, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Lebihan, Laetitia & Mao Takongmo, Charles-Olivier, 2019. "Unconditional cash transfers and parental obesity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 224(C), pages 116-126.
    5. Ong, Rachel & Nguyen, Toan & Kendall, Garth, 2018. "The impact of intergenerational financial transfers on health and wellbeing outcomes: A longitudinal study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 214(C), pages 179-186.
    6. Elena Andreyeva & Benjamin Ukert, 2018. "The impact of the minimum wage on health," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 337-375, December.

  8. Au, Nicole & Johnston, David W., 2014. "Self-assessed health: What does it mean and what does it hide?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 21-28.

    Cited by:

    1. Natalia Golini & Viviana Egidi, 2016. "The Latent Dimensions of Poor Self-Rated Health: How Chronic Diseases, Functional and Emotional Dimensions Interact Influencing Self-Rated Health in Italian Elderly," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 321-339, August.
    2. Martin Binder & Guido Buenstorf, 2016. "Smile or Die: Can Subjective Well-Being Increase Survival in the Face of Substantive Health Impairments?," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201633, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    3. Leonardo Becchetti & Maria Bachelet & Fabio Pisani, 2019. "Poor eudaimonic subjective wellbeing as a mortality risk factor," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 36(1), pages 245-272, April.
    4. Karlsson, Martin & Klohn, Florian & Rickayzen, Ben, 2018. "The role of heterogeneous parameters for the detection of selection in insurance contracts," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 110-121.
    5. Philippe Tessier & Josselin Thuilliez, 2018. "Does freedom make a difference?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 19(8), pages 1189-1205, November.
    6. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Who provides inconsistent reports of their health status? The importance of age, cognitive ability and socioeconomic status," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 191(C), pages 9-18.
    7. Kaneva, Maria & Baidin, Valerii, 2018. "Heterogeneity in reporting self-assessed health of the Russians," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 51, pages 102-125.
    8. Hjorthen, Sofie L. & Sund, Erik R. & Skalická, Věra & Krokstad, Steinar, 2020. "Understanding coastal public health: Employment, behavioural and psychosocial factors associated with geographical inequalities. The HUNT study, Norway," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 264(C).
    9. Emmanuelle Piérard, 2016. "The effect of health care expenditures on self-rated health status and the Health Utility Index: Evidence from Canada," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 1-21, March.
    10. Liliya Leopold, 2019. "Health Measurement and Health Inequality Over the Life Course: A Comparison of Self-rated Health, SF-12, and Grip Strength," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(2), pages 763-784, April.
    11. O'Doherty, M.G. & French, D. & Steptoe, A. & Kee, F., 2017. "Social capital, deprivation and self-rated health: Does reporting heterogeneity play a role? Results from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 179(C), pages 191-200.
    12. Zarychta, Alan, 2015. "Community trust and household health: A spatially-based approach with evidence from rural Honduras," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 85-94.
    13. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2019. "Health outcomes, health inequality and Mandarin proficiency in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 1-1.
    14. Yuan, Liang & Shin, Kongjoo & Managi, Shunsuke, 2018. "Subjective Well-being and Environmental Quality: The Impact of Air Pollution and Green Coverage in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 153(C), pages 124-138.
    15. Cheny, L.; & Clarke, P.M.; & Petrie, D.J.; & Staub, K.E.;, 2018. "The effects of self-assessed health: Dealing with and understanding misclassification bias," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/26, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    16. Oksuzyan, Anna & Dańko, Maciej J. & Caputo, Jennifer & Jasilionis, Domantas & Shkolnikov, Vladimir M., 2019. "Is the story about sensitive women and stoical men true? Gender differences in health after adjustment for reporting behavior," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 228(C), pages 41-50.
    17. Regina Frei & Sarah R Haile & Margot Mutsch & Sabine Rohrmann, 2015. "Relationship of Serum Vitamin D Concentrations and Allostatic Load as a Measure of Cumulative Biological Risk among the US Population: A Cross-Sectional Study," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 10(10), pages 1-17, October.

  9. Nicole Au & Bruce Hollingsworth & Jean Spinks, 2014. "Measuring the Efficiency of Health Services in Lower-income Countries: The Case of Papua New Guinea," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 32(2), pages 259-272, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Nurhafiza Md Hamzah & Kok Fong See, 2019. "Technical efficiency and its influencing factors in Malaysian hospital pharmacy services," Health Care Management Science, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 462-474, September.
    2. Obure, Carol Dayo & Jacobs, Rowena & Guinness, Lorna & Mayhew, Susannah & Vassall, Anna, 2016. "Does integration of HIV and sexual and reproductive health services improve technical efficiency in Kenya and Swaziland? An application of a two-stage semi parametric approach incorporating quality me," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 147-156.
    3. Jaehee Hwang & Jonghoon Park & Seongwoo Lee, 2018. "The Impact of the Comprehensive Rural Village Development Program on Rural Sustainability in Korea," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(7), pages 1-1, July.

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