IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/ppi149.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Joshua C. Pinkston

Personal Details

First Name:Joshua
Middle Name:C.
Last Name:Pinkston
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppi149
http://www.joshpinkston.com
Terminal Degree:2001 Department of Economics; Northwestern University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Economics Department
University of Louisville

Louisville, Kentucky (United States)
http://business.louisville.edu/economics/

:


RePEc:edi:selouus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Charles J. Courtemanche & Joshua C. Pinkston & Christopher J. Ruhm & George Wehby, 2015. "Can Changing Economic Factors Explain the Rise in Obesity?," NBER Working Papers 20892, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Fernandez, Jose & Gohmann, Stephan & Pinkston, Joshua, 2015. "Breaking Bad: Are Meth Labs Justified in Dry Counties?," MPRA Paper 66274, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Pinkston, Joshua, 2015. "The Dynamic Effects of Obesity on the Wages of Young Workers," MPRA Paper 64641, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Courtemanche, Charles & Pinkston, Joshua C. & Stewart, Jay, 2014. "Adjusting Body Mass for Measurement Error with Invalid Validation Data," IZA Discussion Papers 8009, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2006. "A Model of Asymmetric Employer Learning With Testable Implications," Working Papers 390, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  6. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2006. "How Much Do Employers Learn from Referrals?," Working Papers 392, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  7. Jens Otto Ludwig & Greg Duncan & Joshua C. Pinkston, 2000. "Neighborhood Effects on Economic Self-Sufficiency: Evidence from a Randomized Housing-Mobility Experiment," JCPR Working Papers 159, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  8. Ludwig, Jens & Duncan, Greg J. & Pinkston, Joshua C., 1999. "Housing Vouchers and Economic Self-Sufficiency: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt76s50190, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.

Articles

  1. Pinkston, Joshua C., 2017. "The dynamic effects of obesity on the wages of young workers," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 27(PA), pages 154-166.
  2. Charles J. Courtemanche & Joshua C. Pinkston & Christopher J. Ruhm & George L. Wehby, 2016. "Can Changing Economic Factors Explain the Rise in Obesity?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 1266-1310, April.
  3. Courtemanche, Charles & Pinkston, Joshua C. & Stewart, Jay, 2015. "Adjusting body mass for measurement error with invalid validation data," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 275-293.
  4. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2012. "How Much Do Employers Learn from Referrals?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 317-341, April.
  5. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2009. "A Model of Asymmetric Employer Learning with Testable Implications," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(1), pages 367-394.
  6. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2006. "A Test of Screening Discrimination with Employer Learning," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(2), pages 267-284, January.
  7. Ludwig, Jens & Duncan, Greg J. & Pinkston, Joshua C., 2005. "Housing mobility programs and economic self-sufficiency: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 131-156, January.
  8. Pinkston, Joshua C., 2003. "Screening discrimination and the determinants of wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(6), pages 643-658, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Charles J. Courtemanche & Joshua C. Pinkston & Christopher J. Ruhm & George Wehby, 2015. "Can Changing Economic Factors Explain the Rise in Obesity?," NBER Working Papers 20892, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Courtemanche, Charles & Denteh, Augustine & Tchernis, Rusty, 2018. "Estimating the Associations between SNAP and Food Insecurity, Obesity, and Food Purchases with Imperfect Administrative Measures of Participation," IZA Discussion Papers 11412, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Morales, Leonardo Fabio & Gordon-Larsen, Penny & Guilkey, David, 2016. "Obesity and health-related decisions: An empirical model of the determinants of weight status across the transition from adolescence to young adulthood," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 46-62.
    3. Christopher S. Carpenter & D. Sebastian Tello-Trillo, 2015. "Do ‘Cheeseburger Bills’ Work? Effects of Tort Reform for Fast Food," NBER Working Papers 21170, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Courtemanche, Charles & Tchernis, Rusty & Ukert, Benjamin, 2018. "The effect of smoking on obesity: Evidence from a randomized trial," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 31-44.
    5. Harris, Matthew C., 2017. "Imperfect information on physical activity and caloric intake," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 112-125.

  2. Fernandez, Jose & Gohmann, Stephan & Pinkston, Joshua, 2015. "Breaking Bad: Are Meth Labs Justified in Dry Counties?," MPRA Paper 66274, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. GRANGER Maury & PRICE Gregory, 2016. "Breaking Bad In Mississippi: Do County-Level Alcohol Sale Bans Encourage Crystal Methamphetamine Production And Consumption?," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 11(3), pages 55-66, December.

  3. Pinkston, Joshua, 2015. "The Dynamic Effects of Obesity on the Wages of Young Workers," MPRA Paper 64641, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Donna B. Gilleskie & Euna Han & Edward C. Norton, 2016. "Disentangling the Contemporaneous and Dynamic Effects of Human and Health Capital on Wages over the Life Cycle," NBER Working Papers 22430, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Frieder Kropfhäußer & Marco Sunder, 2014. "A Weighty Issue Revisited: The Dynamic Effect of Body Weight on Earnings and Satisfaction in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 635, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Kropfhäußer, Frieder & Sunder, Marco, 2013. "A weighty issue revisited: the dynamic effect of body weight on earnings and satisfaction in Germany," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79895, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Courtemanche, Charles & Pinkston, Joshua C. & Stewart, Jay, 2014. "Adjusting Body Mass for Measurement Error with Invalid Validation Data," IZA Discussion Papers 8009, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Asia Sikora Kessler, 2015. "Reporting error in weight and height among the elderly: Implications and recommendations for estimating healthcare costs," DETU Working Papers 1501, Department of Economics, Temple University.

  4. Courtemanche, Charles & Pinkston, Joshua C. & Stewart, Jay, 2014. "Adjusting Body Mass for Measurement Error with Invalid Validation Data," IZA Discussion Papers 8009, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Charles Courtemanche & James Marton & Benjamin Ukert & Aaron Yelowitz & Daniela Zapata, 2017. "Early Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Health Care Access, Risky Health Behaviors, and Self-Assessed Health," NBER Working Papers 23269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Lorenzo N. Almada & Rusty Tchernis, 2016. "Measuring Effects of SNAP on Obesity at the Intensive Margin," NBER Working Papers 22681, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Lorenzo Almada & Ian McCarthy & Rusty Tchernis, 2016. "What Can We Learn about the Effects of Food Stamps on Obesity in the Presence of Misreporting?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 98(4), pages 997-1017.
    4. Wang, Chenggang & Wang, Huixia & Halliday, Timothy J., 2017. "Health and Health Inequality during the Great Recession: Evidence from the PSID," IZA Discussion Papers 10808, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Burke, Mary A. & Carman, Katherine Grace, 2016. "You can be too thin (but not too tall): social desirability bias in self-reports of weight and height," Working Papers 16-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    6. Charles Courtemanche & Rusty Tchernis & Xilin Zhou, 2017. "Parental Work Hours and Childhood Obesity: Evidence Using Instrumental Variables Related to Sibling School Eligibility," Working Papers 2017-041, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    7. Buchmueller, Thomas C. & Johar, Meliyanni, 2015. "Obesity and health expenditures: Evidence from Australia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 42-58.
    8. Classen, Timothy J. & Thompson, Owen, 2016. "Genes and the intergenerational transmission of BMI and obesity," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 121-133.
    9. Courtemanche, Charles & Pinkston, Joshua C. & Stewart, Jay, 2014. "Adjusting Body Mass for Measurement Error with Invalid Validation Data," IZA Discussion Papers 8009, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Cawley, John & Maclean, Johanna Catherine & Sikora Kessler, Asia, 2017. "Reporting error in weight and height among older adults: Implications for estimating healthcare costs," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 9(C), pages 122-144.
    11. Courtemanche, Charles & Tchernis, Rusty & Ukert, Benjamin, 2018. "The effect of smoking on obesity: Evidence from a randomized trial," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 31-44.
    12. Buttet, Sebastien & Dolar, Veronika, 2015. "Toward a quantitative theory of food consumption choices and body weight," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 143-156.
    13. Chenggang Wang & Huixia Wang & Timothy J. Halliday, 2017. "Health and Health Inequality during the Great Recession: Evidence from the PSID," Working Papers 201703, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    14. Cawley, John & Maclean, Johanna Catherine & Hammer, Mette & Wintfeld, Neil, 2015. "Reporting error in weight and its implications for bias in economic models," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 27-44.
    15. Silvia Barbaresco & Charles J. Courtemanche & Yanling Qi, 2014. "Impacts of the Affordable Care Act Dependent Coverage Provision on Health-Related Outcomes of Young Adults," NBER Working Papers 20148, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Charles J. Courtemanche & Joshua C. Pinkston & Christopher J. Ruhm & George L. Wehby, 2016. "Can Changing Economic Factors Explain the Rise in Obesity?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 1266-1310, April.
    17. Anthony M Yezer & Stephen J Popick, 2017. "Climate Preferences, Obesity, and Unobserved Heterogeneity in Cities," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 47(3), pages 309-329, Fall.
    18. Harris, Matthew C., 2017. "Imperfect information on physical activity and caloric intake," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 112-125.
    19. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Asia Sikora Kessler, 2015. "Reporting error in weight and height among the elderly: Implications and recommendations for estimating healthcare costs," DETU Working Papers 1501, Department of Economics, Temple University.

  5. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2006. "A Model of Asymmetric Employer Learning With Testable Implications," Working Papers 390, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    Cited by:

    1. Jin Li & Jun Yu, 2017. "A Theory Of Turnover And Wage Dynamics," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 223-236, January.
    2. Bognanno, Michael L. & Melero Martín, Eduardo, 2012. "Promotion Signals, Age and Education," IZA Discussion Papers 6431, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Ian Jewitt & Clare Leaver & Heski Bar-Isaac, 2007. "Information and Human Capital Management," Economics Series Working Papers 367, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    4. Nakabayashi, Masaki, 2011. "Schooling, employer learning, and internal labor market effect: Wage dynamics and human capital investment in the Japanese steel industry, 1930-1960s," MPRA Paper 30749, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 06 May 2011.
    5. Waldman, Michael, 2016. "The dual avenues of labor market signaling," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 120-134.
    6. ARAKI Shota & KAWAGUCHI Daiji & ONOZUKA Yuki, 2015. "University Prestige, Performance Evaluation, and Promotion: Estimating the employer learning model using personnel datasets," Discussion papers 15027, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    7. NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2011. "Extended Schooling and Internalized Training: Skill Elements Evolution of Blue-collar Workers in an Internal Labor Market," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f157, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised Aug 2012.
    8. Julien Prat & Carlos Alos-Ferrer, 2007. "Job Market Signaling and Employer Learning," 2007 Meeting Papers 648, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Ján Zábojník, 2012. "Promotion tournaments in market equilibrium," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 51(1), pages 213-240, September.
    10. Light, Audrey & McGee, Andrew, 2015. "Does employer learning vary by schooling attainment? The answer depends on how career start dates are defined," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 57-66.
    11. Dato, Simon & Grunewald, Andreas & Kräkel, Matthias & Müller, Daniel, 2016. "Asymmetric employer information, promotions, and the wage policy of firms," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 273-300.
    12. Paul Oyer & Scott Schaefer, 2010. "Personnel Economics: Hiring and Incentives," NBER Working Papers 15977, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Waldman, Michael & Zax, Ori, 2014. "An exploration of the promotion signaling distortion," MPRA Paper 60656, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Arvidsson, Sara, 2011. "Predictors of customer loyalty in automobile insurance - The role of private information in risky driving behavior and claim history," Working papers in Transport Economics 2011:2, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
    15. Theodore Koutmeridis, 2013. "The Market for "Rough Diamonds": Information, Finance and Wage Inequality," Discussion Paper Series, Department of Economics 201307, Department of Economics, University of St. Andrews, revised 14 Oct 2013.
    16. Suman Ghosh & Michael Waldman, 2006. "Standard Promotion Practices Versus Up-Or-Out Contracts," Working Papers 06007, Department of Economics, College of Business, Florida Atlantic University.
    17. Catherine Haeck & Frank Verboven, 2012. "The Internal Economics of a University: Evidence from Personnel Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(3), pages 591-626.
    18. Xin Jin, 2014. "The Signaling Role of Not Being Promoted: Theory and Evidence," Working Papers 0314, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
    19. Xin Jin, 2014. "Flattening Firms and Wage Distribution," Working Papers 0414, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
    20. Bas Klaauw & António Dias da Silva, 2011. "Wage dynamics and promotions inside and between firms," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1513-1548, October.
    21. Kevin Lang & Russell Weinstein, 2016. "A Test of Adverse Selection in the Market for Experienced Workers," NBER Working Papers 22387, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Lisa B. Kahn, 2013. "Asymmetric Information between Employers," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(4), pages 165-205, October.
    23. Valerie Smeets & Michael Waldman & Frederic Warzynski, 2013. "Performance, Career Dynamics, and Span of Control," Economics Working Papers 2013-02, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    24. Theodore Papageorgiou, 2009. "Learning Your Comparative Advantages," 2009 Meeting Papers 1150, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    25. Audrey Light & Andrew McGee, 2015. "Employer Learning and the “Importance” of Skills," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(1), pages 72-107.
    26. Emiko Usui & Seik Kim, 2013. "Employer Learning, Job Mobility, and Wage Dynamics," 2013 Meeting Papers 912, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    27. Jin, Xin, 2014. "Flattening Firms and Wage Distribution," MPRA Paper 58485, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    28. Mohrenweiser, Jens & Wydra-Sommaggio, Gaby & Zwick, Thomas, 2015. "Work-related ability as source of information advantages of training employers," ZEW Discussion Papers 15-057, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    29. Alex Wood-Doughty, 2016. "Do Employers Learn from Public, Subjective, Performance Reviews?," Working Papers 16-11, NET Institute.
    30. Waldman, Michael, 2013. "Classic promotion tournaments versus market-based tournaments," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 198-210.
    31. Bok Hoon & Daniel Parent, 2013. "Learning and the Form of Compensation," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 79-98, March.
    32. Hensvik, Lena & Nordström Skans, Oskar, 2013. "Social networks, employee selection and labor market outcomes," Working Paper Series 2013:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    33. Papageorgiou, Theodore, 2018. "Large firms and within firm occupational reallocation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 184-223.
    34. Ferreira, Daniel & Nikolowa, Radoslawa, 2017. "Adverse Selection and Assortative Matching in Labor Markets," CEPR Discussion Papers 11869, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    35. Jed DeVaro & Michael Waldman, 2012. "The Signaling Role of Promotions: Further Theory and Empirical Evidence," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 91-147.
    36. Seik Kim & Emiko Usui, 2012. "Employer Learning, Job Changes, and Wage Dynamics," Working Papers UWEC-2012-01, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
    37. Núria Rodríquez-Planas, 2011. "Displacement, Signaling, and Recall Expectations," Working Papers 550, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    38. Cassidy, Hugh & DeVaro, Jed & Kauhanen, Antti, 2016. "Promotion signaling, gender, and turnover: New theory and evidence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 126(PA), pages 140-166.
    39. Jens Mohrenweiser & Gabriele Wydra-Somaggio & Thomas Zwick, 2017. "Information Advantages of Training Employers Despite Credible Training Certificates," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0121, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Apr 2017.
    40. Li, Jin, 2013. "Job mobility, wage dispersion, and technological change: An asymmetric information perspective," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 105-126.
    41. Ian Jewitt & Clare Leaver & Heski Bar-Isaac, 2014. "Asymmetric Information and Adverse Selection," Economics Series Working Papers 695, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    42. Jin, Xin, 2014. "The Signaling Role of Note Being Promoted: Theory and Evidence," MPRA Paper 58484, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    43. Ben Kriechel & Samuel Muehlemann & Harald Pfeifer & Miriam Schuette, 2011. "Works councils, collective bargaining and apprenticeship training," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0057, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    44. Michael Bates, 2016. "Public and Private Learning in the Market for Teachers: Evidence from the Adoption of Value-Added Measures," Working Papers 201616, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    45. Daniel Ferreira & Radoslawa Nikolowa, 2015. "Misallocation of Talent in Competitive Labor Markets," Working Papers 740, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.

  6. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2006. "How Much Do Employers Learn from Referrals?," Working Papers 392, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Uta Schoenberg, 2011. "Referral-based Job Search Networks," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2011012, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    2. Manolis Galenianos, 2013. "Learning About Match Quality and the Use of Referrals," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(4), pages 668-690, October.
    3. Manolis Galenianos, 2012. "Learning Through Referrals," 2012 Meeting Papers 814, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Hensvik, Lena & Nordström Skans, Oskar, 2013. "Social networks, employee selection and labor market outcomes," Working Paper Series 2013:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    5. Rao, Neel, 2016. "Social effects in employer learning: An analysis of siblings," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 24-36.
    6. Manolis Galenianos, 2016. "Referral networks and inequality," 2016 Meeting Papers 1173, Society for Economic Dynamics.

  7. Jens Otto Ludwig & Greg Duncan & Joshua C. Pinkston, 2000. "Neighborhood Effects on Economic Self-Sufficiency: Evidence from a Randomized Housing-Mobility Experiment," JCPR Working Papers 159, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Patrick J. Bayer & Stephen L. Ross, 2010. "Identifying Individual and Group Effects in the Presence of Sorting: A Neighborhood Effects Application," Working Papers 10-50, Duke University, Department of Economics.
    2. Dominique Goux & Eric Maurin, 2007. "Close Neighbours Matter: Neighbourhood Effects on Early Performance at School," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(523), pages 1193-1215, October.
    3. David I. Levine & Gary Painter, 2003. "Are Measured School Effects Just Sorting?," Working Paper 8619, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    4. Krauth, Brian V., 2004. "A dynamic model of job networking and social influences on employment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1185-1204, March.
    5. Levine, David I. & Painter, Gary, 2008. "Are measured school effects just sorting?: Causality and correlation in the National Education Longitudinal Survey," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 460-470, August.
    6. George Galster & Roger Andersson & Sako Musterd, 2015. "Are Males' Incomes Influenced by the Income Mix of Their Male Neighbors? Explorations into Nonlinear and Threshold Effects in Stockholm," Housing Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(2), pages 315-343, March.
    7. Thomas J. Nechyba & Randall P. Walsh, 2004. "Urban Sprawl," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(4), pages 177-200, Fall.
    8. Lapar, Ma. Lucila A. & Holloway, Garth J. & Ehui, Simeon K., 2003. "How Big Is Your Neighborhood? Spatial Implications Of Market Participation By Smallholder Livestock Producers," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25860, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Shroder, Mark, 2002. "Does housing assistance perversely affect self-sufficiency? A review essay," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 381-417, December.

  8. Ludwig, Jens & Duncan, Greg J. & Pinkston, Joshua C., 1999. "Housing Vouchers and Economic Self-Sufficiency: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt76s50190, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.

    Cited by:

    1. Lawrence F. Katz & Jeffrey R. Kling & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 2000. "The Early Impacts of Moving to Opportunity in Boston," Working Papers 276, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..

Articles

  1. Pinkston, Joshua C., 2017. "The dynamic effects of obesity on the wages of young workers," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 27(PA), pages 154-166.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Charles J. Courtemanche & Joshua C. Pinkston & Christopher J. Ruhm & George L. Wehby, 2016. "Can Changing Economic Factors Explain the Rise in Obesity?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 1266-1310, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Courtemanche, Charles & Pinkston, Joshua C. & Stewart, Jay, 2015. "Adjusting body mass for measurement error with invalid validation data," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 275-293.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2012. "How Much Do Employers Learn from Referrals?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 317-341, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2009. "A Model of Asymmetric Employer Learning with Testable Implications," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(1), pages 367-394.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2006. "A Test of Screening Discrimination with Employer Learning," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(2), pages 267-284, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Brück-Klingberg, Andrea & Burkert, Carola & Garloff, Alfred & Seibert, Holger & Wapler, Rüdiger, 2011. "Does higher education help immigrants find a job? : A survival analysis," IAB Discussion Paper 201106, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    2. Light, Audrey & McGee, Andrew, 2015. "Does employer learning vary by schooling attainment? The answer depends on how career start dates are defined," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 57-66.
    3. Yariv Fadlon, 2015. "Statistical Discrimination and the Implication of Employer-Employee Racial Matches," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 232-248, June.
    4. ZHANGALIYEVA, Aigerim & NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2013. "Legacy of Czar: The Russian Dual System of Schooling and Signaling," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f163, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised 16 Feb 2018.
    5. Audrey Light & Andrew McGee, 2015. "Employer Learning and the “Importance” of Skills," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(1), pages 72-107.
    6. Emiko Usui & Seik Kim, 2013. "Employer Learning, Job Mobility, and Wage Dynamics," 2013 Meeting Papers 912, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Hensvik, Lena & Nordström Skans, Oskar, 2013. "Social networks, employee selection and labor market outcomes," Working Paper Series 2013:15, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    8. Seik Kim & Emiko Usui, 2012. "Employer Learning, Job Changes, and Wage Dynamics," Working Papers UWEC-2012-01, University of Washington, Department of Economics.

  7. Ludwig, Jens & Duncan, Greg J. & Pinkston, Joshua C., 2005. "Housing mobility programs and economic self-sufficiency: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 131-156, January.

    Cited by:

    1. John I. Carruthers & Natasha T. Duncan & Brigitte S. Waldorf, 2013. "Public And Subsidized Housing As A Platform For Becoming A United States Citizen," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 60-90, February.
    2. Jacob Vigdor & Jens Ludwig, 2007. "Segregation and the Black-White Test Score Gap," NBER Working Papers 12988, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Katz, Lawrence & Duncan, Greg J. & Kling, Jeffrey R. & Kessler, Ronald C. & Ludwig, Jens & Sanbonmatsu, Lisa & Liebman, Jeffrey B., 2008. "What Can We Learn about Neighborhood Effects from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment?," Scholarly Articles 2766959, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    4. Caliendo, Marco & Künn, Steffen & Mahlstedt, Robert, 2017. "The return to labor market mobility: An evaluation of relocation assistance for the unemployed," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 136-151.
    5. Patrick J. Bayer & Stephen L. Ross, 2010. "Identifying Individual and Group Effects in the Presence of Sorting: A Neighborhood Effects Application," Working Papers 10-50, Duke University, Department of Economics.
    6. Chen, Jie, 2006. "The Dynamics of Housing Allowance Claims in Sweden: A discrete-time hazard analysis," Working Paper Series 2006:1, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    7. Lui, Hon-Kwong & Suen, Wing, 2011. "The effects of public housing on internal mobility in Hong Kong," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 15-29, March.
    8. Osvaldo Larrañaga Jiménez & Claudia Sanhueza Riveros, 2007. "Residential Segregation Effects on Poor’s Opportunities in Chile," Working Papers wp259, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    9. Jeffrey R. Kling & Jeffrey Liebman & Lawrence F. Katz & Lisa Sanbonmatsu, 2004. "Moving to Opportunity and Tranquility: Neighborhood Effects on Adult Economic Self-Sufficiency and Health From a Randomized Housing Voucher Experiment," Working Papers 5, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    10. Caliendo, Marco & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Hennecke, Juliane & Uhlendorff, Arne, 2015. "Job Search, Locus of Control, and Internal Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 9600, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  8. Pinkston, Joshua C., 2003. "Screening discrimination and the determinants of wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(6), pages 643-658, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Drydakis, Nick, 2011. "Roma Women in Athenian Firms: Do They Face Wage Bias?," IZA Discussion Papers 5732, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Nakabayashi, Masaki, 2011. "Schooling, employer learning, and internal labor market effect: Wage dynamics and human capital investment in the Japanese steel industry, 1930-1960s," MPRA Paper 30749, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 06 May 2011.
    3. Rune V. Lesner, 2016. "Testing for Statistical Discrimination based on Gender," Economics Working Papers 2016-07, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    4. David Masclet & Emmanuel Peterle & Sophie Larribeau, 2012. "The Role of Information in Deterring Discrimination: A New Experimental Evidence of Statistical Discrimination," Economics Working Paper Archive (University of Rennes 1 & University of Caen) 201238, Center for Research in Economics and Management (CREM), University of Rennes 1, University of Caen and CNRS.
    5. Dickinson, David L. & Masclet, David & Peterle, Emmanuel, 2017. "Discrimination as Favoritism: The Private Benefits and Social Costs of In-group Favoritism in an Experimental Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 10599, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2011. "Acquired Skills and Learned Abilities: Wage Dynamics of Blue-collar Workers in Internal Labor Markets," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f153, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised Apr 2012.
    7. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2006. "A Model of Asymmetric Employer Learning With Testable Implications," Working Papers 390, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    8. Rao, Neel, 2016. "Social effects in employer learning: An analysis of siblings," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 24-36.
    9. Joshua C. Pinkston, 2006. "How Much Do Employers Learn from Referrals?," Working Papers 392, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (3) 2014-03-01 2015-02-05 2015-06-05
  2. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2015-02-05 2015-06-05
  3. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2006-02-26
  4. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2015-06-05
  5. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2006-02-26
  6. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2015-09-05
  7. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (1) 2015-06-05
  8. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2006-02-26

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Joshua C. Pinkston should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.