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Francisco Javier Braña
(Francisco Javier Brana)

Personal Details

First Name:Francisco
Middle Name:Javier
Last Name:Brana
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbr128
Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales Universidad Complutense de Madrid 28223, Pozuelo de Alarcón (Madrid) Tfno. +34 91 394 24 90 / +34 91 394 24 86 fjbrana@ucm.es

Affiliation

Departamento de Economía Aplicada
Facultad de Derecho
Universidad de Salamanca

Salamanca, Spain
http://www3.usal.es/~econapli/
RePEc:edi:dpsales (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Francisco-Javier Braña Pino, 2020. "Cuarta revolución industrial, automatización y digitalización: una visión desde la periferia de la Unión Europea en tiempos de pandemia," Working Papers del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales 2004, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales.
  2. René Böheim & Christoph Freudenthaler & Mario Lackner, 2016. "Gender Differences in Risk-Taking: Evidence from Professional Basketball," Economics working papers 2016-07, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  3. José-Ignacio Antón & Francisco-Javier BRAÑA & Rafael MUÑOZ DE BUSTILLO, 2015. "An Analysis of the Cost of Disability across Europe using the Standard of Living Approach," Economics working papers 2015-08, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.

Articles

  1. Francisco-Javier Braña, 2019. "A fourth industrial revolution? Digital transformation, labor and work organization: a view from Spain," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 46(3), pages 415-430, September.
  2. José-Ignacio Antón & Francisco-Javier Braña & Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo, 2016. "An analysis of the cost of disability across Europe using the standard of living approach," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 281-306, August.
  3. Viscusi, W Kip & Carvalho, Irineu & Antoñanzas, Fernando & Rovira, Joan & Braña, Francisco J. & Portillo, Fabiola, 2000. "Smoking Risks in Spain: Part III--Determinants of Smoking Behavior," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 21(2-3), pages 213-234, November.
  4. Antoñanzas, Fernando & Viscusi, W. Kip & Rovira, Joan & Braña, Francisco J. & Portillo, Fabiola & Carvalho, Iirineu, 2000. "Smoking Risks in Spain: Part I--Perception of Risks to the Smoker," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 21(2-3), pages 161-186, November.
    RePEc:lrk:eeaart:22_3_15 is not listed on IDEAS
    RePEc:lrk:eeaart:22_2_2 is not listed on IDEAS

Chapters

  1. Francisco Javier Braña Pino & José-Ignacio Antón Pérez, 2014. "Rendimiento privado de la educación y prima salarial en España. Un meta-análisis," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9, in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 48, pages 923-938, Asociación de Economía de la Educación.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. René Böheim & Christoph Freudenthaler & Mario Lackner, 2016. "Gender Differences in Risk-Taking: Evidence from Professional Basketball," Economics working papers 2016-07, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.

    Cited by:

    1. René Böheim & Christoph Freudenthaler & Mario Lackner, 2019. "Do male managers increase risk-taking of female teams? Evidence from the NCAA," Economics working papers 2019-03, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    2. Pikos, Anna Katharina & Straub, Alexander, 2019. "Mind the absent gap: Gender-specific competitiveness in non-professional sports," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-652, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    3. Czibor, Eszter & Claussen, Jörg & van Praag, Mirjam, 2019. "Women in a men’s world: Risk taking in an online card game community," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 62-89.
    4. René Böheim & Dominik Grübl & Mario Lackner, 2017. "Gender Differences in Competitiveness," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(02), pages 13-17, August.
    5. Oliver Gürtler & Lennart Struth & Max Thon, 2022. "Competition and Risk-Taking," ECONtribute Discussion Papers Series 181, University of Bonn and University of Cologne, Germany.
    6. Pikos, Anna Katharina & Straub, Alexander, 2021. "Different but stable - gender-specific competitive behaviour across age," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-689, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    7. René Böheim & Mario Lackner & Wilhelm Wagner, 2020. "Raising the Bar: Causal evidence on gender differences in risk-taking from a natural experiment," Economics working papers 2020-01, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    8. Mario Lackner, 2016. "Teams as Superstars: Effort and Risk Taking in Rank-Order Tournaments for Women and Men," Economics working papers 2016-13, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    9. Anna Katharina Pikos & Alexander Straub, 2020. "Mind the Absent Gap: Gender-Specific Competitive Behavior in Nonprofessional Sports," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 21(3), pages 215-233, April.

  2. José-Ignacio Antón & Francisco-Javier BRAÑA & Rafael MUÑOZ DE BUSTILLO, 2015. "An Analysis of the Cost of Disability across Europe using the Standard of Living Approach," Economics working papers 2015-08, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.

    Cited by:

    1. Áine Roddy, 2022. "Income and conversion handicaps: estimating the impact of child chronic illness/disability on family income and the extra cost of child chronic illness/child disability in Ireland using a standard of ," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 23(3), pages 467-483, April.
    2. Roddy, Áine, 2022. "Income and conversion handicaps: estimating the impact of child chronic illness/disability on family income and the extra cost of child chronic illness/child disability in Ireland using a standard of ," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 111833, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Lukas Schuelke & Luke Munford & Marcello Morciano, 2022. "Estimating the additional costs of living with a disability in the United Kingdom between 2013 and 2016," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 23(2), pages 313-327, March.
    4. Binh Vu & Rasheda Khanam & Maisha Rahman & Son Nghiem, 2020. "The costs of disability in Australia: a hybrid panel-data examination," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 1-10, December.
    5. Karla Romero Starke & Janice Hegewald & Stefanie Schmauder & Pauline Kaboth & Lena Marie Uhlmann & David Reissig & Kristin Klaudia Kaufmann & Jürgen Wegge & Gesine Marquardt & Andreas Seidler, 2022. "Health and Care Dependency of Older Adults in Dresden, Germany: Results from the LAB60+ Study," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(18), pages 1-18, September.
    6. Daniel Mont & Zachary Morris & Mercoledi Nasiir & Nanette Goodman, 2022. "Estimating Households’ Expenditures on Disability in Africa: The Uses and Limitations of the Standard of Living Method," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(23), pages 1-17, December.
    7. Mabel Ho & Eleanor Pullenayegum & David Burnes & Esme Fuller-Thomson, 2022. "Successful Aging among Immigrant and Canadian-Born Older Adults: Findings from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA)," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(20), pages 1-18, October.

Articles

  1. Francisco-Javier Braña, 2019. "A fourth industrial revolution? Digital transformation, labor and work organization: a view from Spain," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 46(3), pages 415-430, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Miceli & Birgit Hagen & Maria Pia Riccardi & Francesco Sotti & Davide Settembre-Blundo, 2021. "Thriving, Not Just Surviving in Changing Times: How Sustainability, Agility and Digitalization Intertwine with Organizational Resilience," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(4), pages 1-17, February.
    2. Emilio Abad-Segura & Mariana-Daniela González-Zamar, 2020. "Research Analysis on Emerging Technologies in Corporate Accounting," Mathematics, MDPI, vol. 8(9), pages 1-29, September.

  2. José-Ignacio Antón & Francisco-Javier Braña & Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo, 2016. "An analysis of the cost of disability across Europe using the standard of living approach," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 281-306, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Viscusi, W Kip & Carvalho, Irineu & Antoñanzas, Fernando & Rovira, Joan & Braña, Francisco J. & Portillo, Fabiola, 2000. "Smoking Risks in Spain: Part III--Determinants of Smoking Behavior," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 21(2-3), pages 213-234, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Nuria Badenes-Plá & Andrew M. Jones, 2003. "Addictive goods and taxes: A survey from an economic perspective," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 167(4), pages 123-153, December.
    2. Rovira, Joan & Viscusi, W. Kip & Antoñanzas, Fernando & Costa, Joan & Hart, Warren & Carvalho, Irineu, 2000. "Smoking Risks in Spain: Part II--Perceptions of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Externalities," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 21(2-3), pages 187-212, November.
    3. Mary Riddel & David Hales, 2018. "Predicting Cancer‐Prevention Behavior: Disentangling the Effects of Risk Aversion and Risk Perceptions," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 38(10), pages 2161-2177, October.
    4. Petter Lundborg, 2007. "Smoking, information sources, and risk perceptions—New results on Swedish data," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 217-240, June.
    5. W. Kip Viscusi, 2016. "Risk Beliefs and Preferences for E-cigarettes," American Journal of Health Economics, MIT Press, vol. 2(2), pages 213-240, Spring.
    6. Aida Isabel Tavares & Pedro Pita Barros, 2011. "Ex-ante Moral Hazard and Primary Prevention, evidence from Portugal," Working Papers de Economia (Economics Working Papers) 56, Departamento de Economia, Gestão e Engenharia Industrial, Universidade de Aveiro.
    7. Fernando Antoñanzas & Roberto Rodríguez, 2007. "Tobacco policies in the European Union: a need for state and continental harmonisation?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 8(4), pages 301-304, December.
    8. Seonghoon Hong & Alan R. Collins, 2010. "The Impact Of Antismoking Policies In Korea On Quit Success And Smoking Intentions," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(4), pages 474-487, October.
    9. Georges Dionne & Claude Fluet & Denise Desjardins, 2007. "Predicted risk perception and risk-taking behavior: The case of impaired driving," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 237-264, December.
    10. Henrik Hammar & Fredrik Carlsson, 2005. "Smokers' expectations to quit smoking," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 257-267, March.
    11. Kan, Kamhon & Tsai, Wei-Der, 2004. "Obesity and risk knowledge," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 907-934, September.
    12. Joan Costa-Font & Joan Rovira, 2005. "When do smokers 'underestimate' smoking related mortality risks?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(13), pages 789-794.
    13. Tianjun Feng & L. Robin Keller & Liangyan Wang & Yitong Wang, 2010. "Product Quality Risk Perceptions and Decisions: Contaminated Pet Food and Lead‐Painted Toys," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 30(10), pages 1572-1589, October.
    14. Angela C. M. Oliveira, 2021. "When risky decisions generate externalities," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 63(1), pages 59-79, August.
    15. Christophe Courbage, 2006. "Smoking Behavior and Rank-Dependent Expected-Uitility," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(II), pages 223-230, June.
    16. Frank Sloan & Alyssa Platt, 2011. "Information, risk perceptions, and smoking choices of youth," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 161-193, April.
    17. Eva Lindbladh & Carl Hampus Lyttkens, 2003. "Polarization in the Reaction to Health‐Risk Information: A Question of Social Position?," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 23(4), pages 841-855, August.
    18. Ahmed Khwaja & Frank Sloan & Sukyung Chung, 2007. "The relationship between individual expectations and behaviors: Mortality expectations and smoking decisions," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 179-201, October.

  4. Antoñanzas, Fernando & Viscusi, W. Kip & Rovira, Joan & Braña, Francisco J. & Portillo, Fabiola & Carvalho, Iirineu, 2000. "Smoking Risks in Spain: Part I--Perception of Risks to the Smoker," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 21(2-3), pages 161-186, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Nuria Badenes-Plá & Andrew M. Jones, 2003. "Addictive goods and taxes: A survey from an economic perspective," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 167(4), pages 123-153, December.
    2. Valerie Lechene & Jerome Adda & University College London and IFS, 2004. "On the Identification of the Effect of Smoking on Mortality," Economics Series Working Papers 184, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    3. Hsieh, Chee-Ruey & Lo, Te-Fen, 2017. "Are smokers too optimistic about their health status: Ex ante perception versus ex post observation," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 169-183.
    4. Petter Lundborg, 2007. "Smoking, information sources, and risk perceptions—New results on Swedish data," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 217-240, June.
    5. Lundborg, Petter & Andersson, Henrik, 2008. "Gender, risk perceptions, and smoking behavior," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1299-1311, September.
    6. Jerome Adda & Valerie Lechene, 2012. "Health Selection and the Effect of Smoking on Mortality," Economics Working Papers ECO2012/02, European University Institute.
    7. Jérôme Adda, 2007. "Behavior towards health risks: An empirical study using the “Mad Cow” crisis as an experiment," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 285-305, December.
    8. ANDERSSON Henrik, 2008. "Perception of Own Death Risk : A Reassessment of Road-Traffic Mortality Risk," LERNA Working Papers 08.26.270, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
    9. Fernando Antoñanzas & Roberto Rodríguez, 2007. "Tobacco policies in the European Union: a need for state and continental harmonisation?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 8(4), pages 301-304, December.
    10. Georges Dionne & Claude Fluet & Denise Desjardins, 2007. "Predicted risk perception and risk-taking behavior: The case of impaired driving," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 237-264, December.
    11. Andersson, Henrik & Lundborg, Petter, 2006. "Perception of Own Death Risk: An Analysis of Road-Traffic and Overall Mortality Risks," Working Papers 2006:1, Swedish National Road & Transport Research Institute (VTI).
    12. Joan Costa-Font & Joan Rovira, 2005. "When do smokers 'underestimate' smoking related mortality risks?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(13), pages 789-794.
    13. Tianjun Feng & L. Robin Keller & Liangyan Wang & Yitong Wang, 2010. "Product Quality Risk Perceptions and Decisions: Contaminated Pet Food and Lead‐Painted Toys," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 30(10), pages 1572-1589, October.
    14. Angela C. M. Oliveira, 2021. "When risky decisions generate externalities," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 63(1), pages 59-79, August.
    15. Frank Sloan & Alyssa Platt, 2011. "Information, risk perceptions, and smoking choices of youth," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 161-193, April.
    16. Eva Lindbladh & Carl Hampus Lyttkens, 2003. "Polarization in the Reaction to Health‐Risk Information: A Question of Social Position?," Risk Analysis, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 23(4), pages 841-855, August.
    17. Steven M. Suranovic, 2005. "An Economic Model of Youth Smoking: Tax and Welfare Effects," HEW 0511003, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. W. Kip Viscusi & Jahn K Hakes, 2008. "Risk Beliefs And Smoking Behavior," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 46(1), pages 45-59, January.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2016-06-25
  2. NEP-NET: Network Economics (1) 2016-06-25
  3. NEP-PAY: Payment Systems & Financial Technology (1) 2021-02-01

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