IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pbi177.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Andrew George Biggs

Personal Details

First Name:Andrew
Middle Name:George
Last Name:Biggs
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbi177
http://www.aei.org/scholar/135

Affiliation

American Enterprise Institute

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.aei.org/

: (202) 862-5800
(202) 862-7178
1150 Seventeenth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036
RePEc:edi:aeiiius (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters Books

Working papers

  1. Andrew G. Biggs, 2019. "The growth of salaries and benefits in the federal government, state and local governments and public education, 1998–2017," AEI Economics Working Papers 1014405, American Enterprise Institute.
  2. Andrew G. Biggs, 2017. "How hard should we push the poor to save for retirement?," AEI Economics Working Papers 935536, American Enterprise Institute.
  3. Andrew G. Biggs, 2016. "The Life Cycle Model, Replacement Rates, and Retirement Income Adequacy," AEI Economics Working Papers 900377, American Enterprise Institute.
  4. Andrew G. Biggs & Sylvester J. Schieber & Gaobo Pang, 2015. "Measuring and communicating Social Security earnings replacement rates," AEI Economics Working Papers 826926, American Enterprise Institute.
  5. Andrew G. Biggs & Jason Richwine, 2014. "Overpaid or underpaid? A state-by-state ranking of public-employee compensation," AEI Economics Working Papers 415891, American Enterprise Institute.
  6. Andrew G. Biggs & Jason Richwine, 2012. "The impact of Act 10 on public sector compensation in Wisconsin," AEI Economics Working Papers 25872, American Enterprise Institute.
  7. Andrew G. Biggs & Jason Richwine, 2011. "Comparing Federal and Private Sector Compensation," AEI Economics Working Papers 47508, American Enterprise Institute.
  8. Andrew G. Biggs & Gayle L. Reznik & Nada O. Eissa, 2010. "The Treatment of Married Women by the Social Security Retirement Program," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2010-17, Center for Retirement Research, revised Nov 2010.
  9. Kevin A. Hassett & Andrew G. Biggs & Matt Jensen, 2010. "A Guide for Deficit Reduction in the United States Based on Historical Consolidations That Worked," AEI Economics Working Papers 16693, American Enterprise Institute.
  10. Andrew Biggs, 2009. "A New Social Security 'Notch'? Bad News for People Born in 1947," Issues in Brief ib2010-9, Center for Retirement Research, revised May 2009.
  11. Andrew G. Biggs, 2008. "Policies to Improve the Resiliency of Long-Term Social Security Financing," AEI Economics Working Papers 49591, American Enterprise Institute.
  12. Andrew G. Biggs & Jeffrey R. Brown & Glenn Springstead, 2005. "Alternative Methods of Price Indexing Social Security: Implications for Benefits and System Financing," NBER Working Papers 11406, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Andrew G. Biggs, 2015. "The state of public pension funding: Are government employee plans back on track?," AEI Economic Perspectives, American Enterprise Institute, September.
  2. Joseph Antos & Alan D. Viard & Alex Brill & Andrew G. Biggs, 2015. "Tax and spending reform for fiscal stability and economic growth," AEI Economic Perspectives, American Enterprise Institute, May.
  3. Andrew G. Biggs & Sylvester J. Schieber, 2015. "Why Americans don't face a retirement crisis," AEI Economic Perspectives, American Enterprise Institute, March.
  4. Andrew G. Biggs, 2014. "Not so modest: Pension benefits for full-career state government employees," AEI Economic Perspectives, American Enterprise Institute, March.
  5. Andrew G. Biggs, 2013. "The multiplying risks of public employee pensions to state and local government budgets," AEI Economic Perspectives, American Enterprise Institute, December.
  6. Biggs, Andrew G., 2012. "Social Security: The Unfinished Work. Charles M. Blahous. Hoover Institution Press, 2010, ISBN 978-0-8179-1194-2, 436 pages," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(01), pages 144-146, January.
  7. Biggs, Andrew G., 2005. "The Coming Generational Storm: What You Need to Know about America's Economic Future by J. Laurence Kotlikoff and Scott Burns, The MIT Press, 2004, ISBN 0-262-11286-8, 274 pages, Price $27.95," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(01), pages 110-111, March.
  8. Biggs, Andrew G., 2005. "Rethinking Pension Reform by Franco Modigliani and Arun Muralidhar, Cambridge University Press, 2004, ISBN 0-521-83411-2, 266 pages, Price $55.00," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(01), pages 109-110, March.
  9. Biggs, Andrew G. & Brown, Jeffrey R. & Springstead, Glenn, 2005. "Alternative Methods of Price Indexing Social Security: Implications for Benefits and System Financing," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 58(3), pages 483-504, September.

Chapters

  1. Andrew Biggs & Clark Burdick & Kent Smetters, 2009. "Pricing Personal Account Benefit Guarantees: A Simplified Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Policy in a Changing Environment, pages 229-249 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Books

  1. Andrew G. Biggs, 2011. "Social Security: The Story of Its Past and a Vision for Its Future," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 6033, July.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Andrew G. Biggs, 2017. "How hard should we push the poor to save for retirement?," AEI Economics Working Papers 935536, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Robert L. Clark & Robert G. Hammond & Melinda Sandler Morrill & Christelle Khalaf, 2017. "Nudging Retirement Savings: A Field Experiment on Supplemental Plans," NBER Working Papers 23679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Andrew G. Biggs, 2016. "The Life Cycle Model, Replacement Rates, and Retirement Income Adequacy," AEI Economics Working Papers 900377, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Congressional Budget Office, 2017. "Measuring the Adequacy of Retirement Income: A Primer," Reports 53191, Congressional Budget Office.

  3. Andrew G. Biggs & Sylvester J. Schieber & Gaobo Pang, 2015. "Measuring and communicating Social Security earnings replacement rates," AEI Economics Working Papers 826926, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Congressional Budget Office, 2017. "Measuring the Adequacy of Retirement Income: A Primer," Reports 53191, Congressional Budget Office.

  4. Andrew G. Biggs & Jason Richwine, 2014. "Overpaid or underpaid? A state-by-state ranking of public-employee compensation," AEI Economics Working Papers 415891, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Amihai Glazer & Hideki Konishi, 2017. "Why High-level Executives Earn Less in the Government Than in the Private Sector," Working Papers 1713, Waseda University, Faculty of Political Science and Economics.

  5. Andrew G. Biggs & Jason Richwine, 2011. "Comparing Federal and Private Sector Compensation," AEI Economics Working Papers 47508, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Justin Falk, 2012. "Comparing Benefits and Total Compensation in the Federal Government and the Private Sector: Working Paper 2012-04," Working Papers 42923, Congressional Budget Office.
    2. Falk Justin R., 2012. "Comparing Benefits and Total Compensation between Similar Federal and Private-Sector Workers," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-37, October.
    3. Justin Falk, 2012. "Comparing Wages in the Federal Government and the Private Sector: Working Paper 2012-03," Working Papers 42922, Congressional Budget Office.

  6. Kevin A. Hassett & Andrew G. Biggs & Matt Jensen, 2010. "A Guide for Deficit Reduction in the United States Based on Historical Consolidations That Worked," AEI Economics Working Papers 16693, American Enterprise Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Alberto Alesina & Silvia Ardagna, 2013. "The Design of Fiscal Adjustments," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 27, pages 19-67 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Alesina, Alberto Francesco & Ardagna, Silvia, 2013. "The Design of Fiscal Adjustments," Scholarly Articles 22801843, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    3. Veronique de Rugy, 2013. "Is Austerity the Answer to Europe's Crisis?," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 33(2), pages 245-251, Spring/Su.
    4. Charles Amo Yartey & Machiko Narita & Shelton M Nicholls & Joel Chiedu Okwuokei, 2012. "The Challenges of Fiscal Consolidation and Debt Reduction in the Caribbean," IMF Working Papers 12/276, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Gordon Brady, 2015. "Austerity in the European Union: Keynesian Stimulus versus Fiscal Consolidation," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(1), pages 55-65, March.
    6. Wiese, Rasmus & Jong-A-Pin, Richard & de Haan, Jakob, 2018. "Can successful fiscal adjustments only be achieved by spending cuts?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 145-166.
    7. Alberto Alesina & Silvia Ardagna, 2013. "The Design of Fiscal Adjustments," Tax Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(1), pages 19-68.
    8. Rasmus Wiese & Richard Jong-A-Pin & Jakob de Haan, 2015. "Are expenditure cuts the only effective way to achieve successful fiscal adjustment," DNB Working Papers 477, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    9. Marek Loužek & Jan SkopeČek, 2015. "Structural problems of the Czech economy," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(2), pages 233-246, June.
    10. Gordon L. Brady & Cosimo Magazzino, 2017. "The Sustainability of Italian Public Debt and Deficit," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 23(1), pages 9-20, February.
    11. Cosimo Magazzino, 2014. "Government Size and Economic Growth in Italy: An Empirical Analyses Based On New Data (1861-2008)," International Journal of Empirical Finance, Research Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 3(2), pages 38-54.

  7. Andrew G. Biggs & Jeffrey R. Brown & Glenn Springstead, 2005. "Alternative Methods of Price Indexing Social Security: Implications for Benefits and System Financing," NBER Working Papers 11406, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Ann Huff Stevens, 2008. "Retirement Wealth Across Cohorts: The Role of Earnings Inequality and Pension Changes," Working Papers wp186, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    2. Chung Tran & Juergen Jung, 2011. "Market Inefficiency, Insurance Mandate and Welfare: U.S. Health Care Reform 2010," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-539, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    3. Lovell, Michael C., 2008. "Social Security's Five OASI Inflation Indexing Problems," Economics Discussion Papers 2008-34, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. John R. Moran & JKosali Ilayperuma Simon, 2006. "Income and the Use of Prescription Drugs by the Elderly: Evidence from the Notch Cohorts," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
    5. Juergen Jung & Chung Tran, 2008. "The Macroeconomics of Health Savings Accounts," CAEPR Working Papers 2007-023, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Department of Economics, Indiana University Bloomington.
    6. John Cawley & John Moran & Kosali Simon, 2010. "The impact of income on the weight of elderly Americans," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(8), pages 979-993, August.

Articles

  1. Andrew G. Biggs, 2014. "Not so modest: Pension benefits for full-career state government employees," AEI Economic Perspectives, American Enterprise Institute, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Touria Jaaidane & Robert J. Gary-Bobo, 2017. "The Evaluation of Pension Reforms in the Public Sector: A Case Study of the Paris Subway Drivers," Post-Print hal-01744562, HAL.

  2. Biggs, Andrew G. & Brown, Jeffrey R. & Springstead, Glenn, 2005. "Alternative Methods of Price Indexing Social Security: Implications for Benefits and System Financing," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 58(3), pages 483-504, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

Books

  1. Andrew G. Biggs, 2011. "Social Security: The Story of Its Past and a Vision for Its Future," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 6033, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Hintermaier & Winfried Koeniger, 2009. "Debt Portfolios," Working Papers 646, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    2. Kluth, Sebastian & Gasche, Martin, 2013. "Ersatzraten in der Gesetzlichen Rentenversicherung," MEA discussion paper series 201311, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    3. Leonard E. Burman & Norma B. Coe & Kevin Pierce & Liu Tian, 2014. "The Effects of the Taxation of Social Security Benefits on Older Workers’ Income and Claiming Decisions," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 67(2), pages 459-486, June.
    4. Michael D. Hurd & Susann Rohwedder, 2015. "Measuring Economic Preparation for Retirement: Income Versus Consumption," Working Papers wp332, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    5. Thomas Hintermaier & Winfried Koeniger, 2011. "On the Evolution of the US Consumer Wealth Distribution," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 14(2), pages 317-338, April.
    6. Matthew S. Rutledge & John E. Lindner, 2016. "Do Late-Career Wages Boost Social Security More For Women Than Men?," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2016-13, Center for Retirement Research.
    7. Joanna Lahey, 2016. "Understanding why black women are not working longer," NBER Working Papers 22680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Guner, Nezih & Lopez-Daneri, Martin & Ventura, Gustavo, 2014. "Heterogeneity and Government Revenues: Higher Taxes at the Top?," IZA Discussion Papers 8335, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Karsten Jeske, 2003. "Pension systems and aggregate shocks," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q1, pages 15-31.
    10. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier & Nahid Tabatabai, 2011. "The Effects of Changes in Women’s Labor Market Attachment on Redistribution Under the Social Security Benefit Formula," Working Papers wp248, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    11. Alicia H. Munnell & Steven A. Sass, 2007. "The labor supply of older American men," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 52.
    12. Shlomo Benartzi & Alessandro Previtero & Richard H. Thaler, 2011. "Annuitization Puzzles," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(4), pages 143-164, Fall.
    13. Stavros Panageas, 2010. "Optimal retirement benefit guarantees," NBER Working Papers 15805, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Li Tan & Cory Koedel, 2017. "The Effects of Differential Income Replacement and Mortality on U.S. Social Security Redistribution," Working Papers 1701, Department of Economics, University of Missouri, revised Jun 2019.
    15. Kluth Sebastian & Gasche Martin, 2015. "Ersatzraten in der Gesetzlichen Rentenversicherung / Replacement Rates in the German Statutory Pension System," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(6), pages 553-583, December.
    16. Barrett, Alan & Nivakoski, Sanna, 2017. "Estimating, and interpreting, retirement income replacement rates," Papers WP575, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    17. Geoffrey T. Sanzenbacher & Jorge D. Ramos-Mercado, 2016. "Calculating Expected Social Security Benefits by Race, Education, and Claiming Age," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2016-14, Center for Retirement Research.
    18. Philip Armour & Michael F. Lovenheim, 2016. "The Effect of Social Security Information on the Labor Supply and Savings of Older Americans," Working Papers wp361, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    19. Douglas Hershey & Joy Jacobs-Lawson, 2012. "Bridging the Gap: Anticipated Shortfalls in Future Retirement Income," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 306-314, September.
    20. Sánchez-Romero, Miguel & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2017. "Redistributive effects of the US pension system among individuals with different life expectancy," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 10(C), pages 51-74.
    21. John B. Shoven & Sita Nataraj Slavov, 2012. "The Decision to Delay Social Security Benefits: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 17866, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Negin Vaghefi & Fatimah Kari & Muzalwana Abdul Talib, 2017. "Poverty and Income Replacement Profile Among EPF Retiree in Malaysia," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 132(3), pages 1065-1078, July.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (2) 2010-06-11 2011-02-05
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2011-02-05
  3. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2005-06-14

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Andrew George Biggs should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.