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Resilience of an African Giant : Boosting Growth and Development in the Democratic Republic of Congo

  • Johannes Herderschee
  • Kai-Alexander Kaiser
  • Daniel Mukoko Samba
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    The size, resources, and location of the Democratic Republic of Congo have an impact on all of Central Africa. The country has unexplored mining resources, massive agricultural potential, and a population of more than 60 million inhabitants. The second largest country in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Democratic Republic of Congo borders nine countries and has complex economic, migration, and political relations with each of them. Its development has a significant impact on the economic growth and political stability of the continent. The international community has a long-standing involvement in the country. During the cold war, Western countries supported the Democratic Republic of Congo, despite its poor economic policies and political repression. Following the end of the cold war, foreign interest declined, reemerging around the turn of the century. In the last 10 years, the international community has invested considerable resources to stabilize the country through international peacekeeping efforts. Rising commodity prices have also ignited interest in the country's unexploited natural resources.

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    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 2359 and published in 2012.
    ISBN: 978-0-8213-8909-6
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:2359
    Contact details of provider: Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
    Phone: (202) 477-1234
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    1. Yingyi Qian & Barry R. Weingast, 1997. "Federalism as a Commitment to Reserving Market Incentives," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 83-92, Fall.
    2. Levine, Ross, 2005. "Finance and Growth: Theory and Evidence," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 12, pages 865-934 Elsevier.
    3. Ge, Wei, 1999. "Special Economic Zones and the Opening of the Chinese Economy: Some Lessons for Economic Liberalization," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(7), pages 1267-1285, July.
    4. World Bank, 2009. "World Development Indicators 2009," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 4367.
    5. Levy, Brian & Fukuyama, Francis, 2010. "Development strategies : integrating governance and growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5196, The World Bank.
    6. World Bank, 2010. "World Development Indicators 2010," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 4373.
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