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Entrepreneurship Education and Training Programs around the World : Dimensions for Success

Author

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  • Alexandria Valerio
  • Brent Parton
  • Alicia Robb

Abstract

Entrepreneurship has attracted global interest for its potential to catalyze economic and social development. Research suggesting that certain entrepreneurial mindsets and skills can be learned has given rise to the field of entrepreneurship education and training (EET). Despite the growth of EET, global knowledge about these programs and their impact remains thin. In response, this study surveys the available literature and program evaluations to propose a Conceptual Framework for understanding the EET program landscape. The study finds that EET today consists of a heterogeneous mix of programs that can be broken into two groups: entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurship training. These programs target a range of participants: secondary and post-secondary education students, as well as potential and practicing entrepreneurs. The outcomes measured by program evaluations are equally diverse but generally fall under the domains of entrepreneurial mindsets and capabilities, entrepreneurial status, and entrepreneurial performance. The dimensions of EET programs vary according the particular target group. Programs targeting secondary education students focus on the development of foundational skills linked to entrepreneurship, while post-secondary education programs emphasize skills related to strategic business planning. Programs targeting potential entrepreneurs generally are embedded within broader support programs and tend to target vulnerable populations for whom employment alternatives may be limited. While programs serving practicing entrepreneurs focus on strengthening entrepreneurs’ knowledge, skills and business practices, which while unlikely to transform an enterprise in the near term, may accrue benefits to entrepreneurs over time. The study also offers implications for policy and program implementation, emphasizing the importance of clarity about target groups and desired outcomes when making program choices, and sound understanding of extent to which publicly-supported programs offer a broader public good, and compare favorably to policy alternatives for supporting the targeted individuals as well as the overall economic and social objectives.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexandria Valerio & Brent Parton & Alicia Robb, 2014. "Entrepreneurship Education and Training Programs around the World : Dimensions for Success," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 18031.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:18031
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lennart Burger & Ivana Blažková, 2020. "Internal Determinants Promoting Corporate Entrepreneurship in Established Organizations: A Systematic Literature Review," Central European Business Review, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2020(2), pages 19-45.
    2. repec:idb:brikps:7203 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Eleonora Fiore & Giuliano Sansone & Emilio Paolucci, 2019. "Entrepreneurship Education in a Multidisciplinary Environment: Evidence from an Entrepreneurship Programme Held in Turin," Administrative Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-28, March.
    4. Kluve, Jochen & Puerto, Olga Susana & Robalino, David A. & Romero, Jose M. & Rother, Friederike & Stöterau, Jonathan & Weidenkaff, Felix & Witte, Marc, 2016. "Do Youth Employment Programs Improve Labor Market Outcomes? A Systematic Review," IZA Discussion Papers 10263, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Premand, Patrick & Brodmann, Stefanie & Almeida, Rita & Grun, Rebekka & Barouni, Mahdi, 2016. "Entrepreneurship Education and Entry into Self-Employment Among University Graduates," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 311-327.
    6. Adedayo O Olofinyehun & Caleb M Adelowo & Abiodun A Egbetokun, 2018. "The supply of high-quality entrepreneurs in developing countries: evidence from Nigeria," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 45(2), pages 269-282.
    7. Margarita Zobnina & Anatoly Korotkov & Aleksandr Rozhkov, 2019. "Structure, Challenges and Opportunities for Development of Entrepreneurial Education in Russian Universities," Foresight and STI Governance (Foresight-Russia till No. 3/2015), National Research University Higher School of Economics, vol. 13(4), pages 69-81.
    8. World Bank, 2015. "Promoting Labor Market Participation and Social Inclusion in Europe and Central Asia's Poorest Countries," World Bank Other Operational Studies 22501, The World Bank.
    9. Ioan-Vladut NUTU & Adina-Roxana MUNTEANU & Ramona-Nicoleta PÎRLOG, 2016. "Impact Factors For The Development Of Young Entrepreneurs In Romania," SEA - Practical Application of Science, Romanian Foundation for Business Intelligence, Editorial Department, issue 12, pages 471-478, December.
    10. Thobile N Radebe, 2019. "The Challenges/Barriers Preventing the South African Youth in Becoming Entrepreneurs: South African Overview," Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, AMH International, vol. 11(4), pages 61-70.
    11. Striebing, Clemens & Kalpazidou Schmidt, Evanthia & Palmén, Rachel, 2019. "Pragmatic ex-ante evaluation using an innovative conceptual framework: The case of a high-tech entrepreneurship program for women," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 77(C).
    12. Alaref, Jumana & Brodmann, Stefanie & Premand, Patrick, 2020. "The medium-term impact of entrepreneurship education on labor market outcomes: Experimental evidence from university graduates in Tunisia," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    13. Catherine Elliott & Catherine Mavriplis & Hanan Anis, 2020. "An entrepreneurship education and peer mentoring program for women in STEM: mentors’ experiences and perceptions of entrepreneurial self-efficacy and intent," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 43-67, March.
    14. Dolapo Adeyanju & John Mburu & Djana Mignouna, 2021. "Youth Agricultural Entrepreneurship: Assessing the Impact of Agricultural Training Programmes on Performance," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(4), pages 1-11, February.
    15. Lubna Rashid, 2019. "Entrepreneurship Education and Sustainable Development Goals: A literature Review and a Closer Look at Fragile States and Technology-Enabled Approaches," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(19), pages 1-23, September.
    16. Alexandria Valerio & Katia Herrera-Sosa & Sebastian Monroy-Taborda & Dandan Chen, 2015. "Armenia Skills toward Employment and Productivity," World Bank Other Operational Studies 25199, The World Bank.
    17. Verónica Alaimo & Mariano Bosch & David S. Kaplan & Carmen Pagés & Laura Ripani, 2015. "Jobs for Growth," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 90977, February.
    18. Mahe, Clotilde, 2017. "Occupational choice of return migrants: Is there a 'Jack-of-all-trades' effect?," MERIT Working Papers 2017-039, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    19. Constanta-Nicoleta Bodea & Radu Ioan Mogos & Maria-Iuliana Dascalu & Augustin Purnus, 2015. "Simulation-Based E-Learning Framework for Entrepreneurship Education and Training," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 17(38), pages 1-10, February.
    20. Cristina Pardo-Garcia & Maja Barac, 2020. "Promoting Employability in Higher Education: A Case Study on Boosting Entrepreneurship Skills," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(10), pages 1-23, May.

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