IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book or follow this series

Constructing Knowledge Societies : New Challenges for Tertiary Education

  • World Bank
Registered author(s):

    This report describes how tertiary education contributes to building up a country's capacity for participation in an increasingly knowledge-based world economy and investigates policy options for tertiary education that have the potential to enhance economic growth and reduce poverty. It examines the following questions: What is the importance of tertiary education for economic and social development? How should developing and transition countries position themselves to take full advantage of the potential contribution of tertiary education? How can the World Bank and other development agencies assist in this process? The report draws on ongoing Bank research and analysis on the dynamics of knowledge economies and on science and technology development. Using this background, it explores how countries can adapt and shape their tertiary education systems to confront successfully the combination of new and old challenges in the context of the rising significance for tertiary education of internal and international market forces. It examines the justification for continuing public support of tertiary education and the appropriate role of the state in support of knowledge-driven economic growth. Finally, it reviews the lessons from recent World Bank experience with support of tertiary education, including ways of minimizing the negative political impact of reforms, and makes recommendations for future Bank involvement.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/15224/249730PUB0REPL00Knowledge0Societies.pdf?sequence=5
    Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 500 Internal Server Error. If this is indeed the case, please notify (Thomas Breineder)


    Download Restriction: no

    as
    in new window

    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 15224 and published in 2002.
    ISBN: 0-8213-5143-5
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:15224
    Contact details of provider: Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
    Phone: (202) 477-1234
    Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
    Email:


    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Scott Stern & Michael E. Porter & Jeffrey L. Furman, 2000. "The Determinants of National Innovative Capacity," NBER Working Papers 7876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Edward L. Glaeser & David Laibson & Bruce Sacerdote, 2001. "The Economic Approach to Social Capital," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1916, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    3. Milanovic, Branko, 1998. "Explaining the increase in inequality during the transition," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1935, The World Bank.
    4. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 2000. "Can Falling Supply Explain the Rising Return to College for Younger Men? A Cohort-Based Analysis," NBER Working Papers 7655, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Endogenous Technological Change," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2135, David K. Levine.
    6. John F. Helliwell, 1996. "Economic Growth and Social Capital in Asia," NBER Working Papers 5470, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ryoo, Jai-Kyung & Nam, Young-Sook & Carnoy, Martin, 1993. "Changing rates of return to education over time: A Korean case study," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 71-80, March.
    8. Birdsall, Nancy, 1996. "Public spending on higher education in developing countries: Too much or too little?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 407-419, October.
    9. Banker, Rajiv D. & Chang, Hsi-Hui & Majumdar, Sumit K., 1998. "Economies of scope in the U.S. telecommunications industry1," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 253-272, June.
    10. Saint, W.S., 1992. "Universities in Africa; Strategies for Stabilization and Revitalization," Papers 194, World Bank - Technical Papers.
    11. Jock R. Anderson, 1999. "Institutional Reforms for Getting an Agricultural Knowledge System to Play Its Role in Economic Growth," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 333-354.
    12. James Bond, 1997. "The Drivers of the Information Revolution : Cost, Computing Power, and Convergence," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11579, The World Bank.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:15224. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Breineder)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.