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Food security in a world of natural resource scarcity: The role of agricultural technologies

Author

Listed:
  • Rosegrant, Mark W.
  • Koo, Jawoo
  • Cenacchi, Nicola
  • Ringler, Claudia
  • Robertson, Richard D.
  • Fisher, Myles
  • Cox, Cindy M.
  • Garrett, Karen
  • Perez, Nicostrato D.
  • Sabbagh, Pascale

Abstract

The world’s population is expected to reach 9 billion by 2050. Climate change, population, and income growth will drive food demand in the coming decades. Baseline scenarios show food prices for maize, rice, and wheat would significantly increase between 2005 and 2050, and the number of people at risk of hunger in the developing world would grow from 881 million in 2005 to more than a billion people by 2050. Food Security in a World of Natural Resource Scarcity: The Role of Agricultural Technologies examines which current and potential strategies offer solutions to fight hunger. The type and effectiveness of agricultural technologies are highly debated, and the debates are often polarized. Technology options are many, but transparent evidence-based information has been inconclusive or scarce. This book endeavors to respond to the challenge of growing food sustainably without degrading our natural resource base. The authors use a groundbreaking modeling approach that combines comprehensive process-based modeling of agricultural technologies with sophisticated global food demand, supply, and trade modeling. This approach assesses the yield and food impact through 2050 of a broad range of agricultural technologies under varying assumptions of climate change for the three key staple crops: maize, rice, and wheat. Geared toward policymakers in ministries of agriculture and national agricultural research institutes, as well as multilateral development banks and the private sector, Food Security in a World of Natural Resource Scarcity provides guidance on various technology strategies and which to pursue as competition grows for land, water, and energy across productive sectors and even increasingly across borders. The book is an important tool for targeting investment decisions today and going forward.

Suggested Citation

  • Rosegrant, Mark W. & Koo, Jawoo & Cenacchi, Nicola & Ringler, Claudia & Robertson, Richard D. & Fisher, Myles & Cox, Cindy M. & Garrett, Karen & Perez, Nicostrato D. & Sabbagh, Pascale, 2014. "Food security in a world of natural resource scarcity: The role of agricultural technologies," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-89629-847-7, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprib:9780896298477
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wusheng Yu & Hans G. Jensen, 2010. "China’s Agricultural Policy Transition: Impacts of Recent Reforms and Future Scenarios," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 343-368, June.
    2. Zou, Xiaoxia & Li, Yu’e & Cremades, Roger & Gao, Qingzhu & Wan, Yunfan & Qin, Xiaobo, 2013. "Cost-effectiveness analysis of water-saving irrigation technologies based on climate change response: A case study of China," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 9-20.
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