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Do water saving technologies save water? Empirical evidence from North China

Author

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  • Huang, Qiuqiong
  • Wang, Jinxia
  • Li, Yumin

Abstract

This paper describes the extent of water saving technologies usage and evaluates their impacts on water use, water productivity, total irrigated sown area and crop mix in North China. A set of panel data collected at the househol.d and plot levels is used in empirical analysis. Water saving technologies are categorized into traditional technologies, household-based technologies and community-based technologies. By 2007, traditional technologies and household-based technologies are used in almost all sample villages. However, the shares of sown area on which water saving technologies are used are still fairly low. Econometric analysis using plot level fixed effects show that using water saving technologies can reduce crop water use and improve the productivity of water. The positive effects are generated mainly through the use of household-based or community-based technologies. The use of water saving technologies does not have statistically significant impacts on total irrigated sown area and crop mix.

Suggested Citation

  • Huang, Qiuqiong & Wang, Jinxia & Li, Yumin, 2017. "Do water saving technologies save water? Empirical evidence from North China," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 1-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeeman:v:82:y:2017:i:c:p:1-16
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jeem.2016.10.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Huang, Qiuqiong & Rozelle, Scott & Lohmar, Bryan & Huang, Jikun & Wang, Jinxia, 2006. "Irrigation, agricultural performance and poverty reduction in China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 30-52, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Berbel, Julio & Gutierrez-Marín, Carlos & Expósito, Alfonso, 2018. "Microeconomic analysis of irrigation efficiency improvement in water use and water consumption," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 203(C), pages 423-429.
    2. Wang, Y. & Huang, J., 2018. "Do forests relieve crop thirst in the face of drought? Empirical evidence from South China," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 276959, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Hou, L. & Min, S. & Huang, Q. & Huang, J., 2018. "Farmers perceptions of, ex ante and ex post adaptations to drought: Empirical evidence from maize farmers in China," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277208, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Borrego-Marín, María M. & Berbel, J., 2019. "Cost-benefit analysis of irrigation modernization in Guadalquivir River Basin," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 212(C), pages 416-423.
    5. Zhang, Ling & Ma, Qimin & Zhao, Yanbo & Wu, Xiaobo & Yu, Wenjun, 2019. "Determining the influence of irrigation efficiency improvement on water use and consumption by conceptually considering hydrological pathways," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 213(C), pages 674-681.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Q25; Q12; Water saving technologies; Water use; Water productivity; Households; Communities;

    JEL classification:

    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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