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Housing Affordability and Permanent Migration Intention of Rural-Urban Migrants

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  • Xin DONG

    () (Institute for Urban and Environmental Studies, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, MCC Tower, 28 Shuguangxili, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100028, P. R. China)

  • Weihua ZHOU

    () (Chinese Academy of Fiscal Sciences, Ministry of Finance of China, 17F, Xinzhi Building, 28(A) Fucheng Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100142, P. R. China)

Abstract

Leading the rural-urban migration is the key to solving the problem of imbalanced urban structure in China; in which the migration will of the rural-urban migrants should not be ignored, especially the permanent will of migration. This paper uses the ratio of rent to income as an indicator of the housing affordability of rural-urban migrants, empirically analyzes the impact of housing affordability on the permanent migration will of rural-urban migrants. It was found that the impact of rent-income ratio is significant and there exists a turning point. Before the point, the ratio is positively correlated with the permanent migration will of rural migrants; whereas after the turning point, they are negatively correlated. Before that point, relative to income of rural migrants, the rents are still bearable and the ratio does not have a negative effect on the migration will, which explains why a large number of rural-urban migrants tend to choose the large-sized cities with higher housing prices, rather than the small and medium-sized cities or small towns with lower housing prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Xin DONG & Weihua ZHOU, 2016. "Housing Affordability and Permanent Migration Intention of Rural-Urban Migrants," Chinese Journal of Urban and Environmental Studies (CJUES), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(02), pages 1-12, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:wsi:cjuesx:v:04:y:2016:i:02:n:s2345748116500196
    DOI: 10.1142/S2345748116500196
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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