IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/mgtdec/v29y2008i2-3p277-292.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

What determines the profitability of foreign direct investment? A subsidiary-level analysis of Japanese multinationals

Author

Listed:
  • Mariko Sakakibara

    (University of California, CA, USA)

  • Hideki Yamawaki

    (Claremont Graduate University, CA, USA)

Abstract

This article identifies key factors that determine the profitability of Japanese firms abroad by using panel-data regression models on new, large-scale, subsidiary-level data over the 1990-1996 period. The results show that the determinants of subsidiary profits differ across host regions, suggesting that the economic and institutional factors specific to host regions influence significantly the profit performances of overseas subsidiaries. While the size effect on the subsidiary profitability is present in all the regions, other effects, such as experience, local supplier networks, local sales and macroeconomic conditions affect the performance of subsidiaries in a different manner by region. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Mariko Sakakibara & Hideki Yamawaki, 2008. "What determines the profitability of foreign direct investment? A subsidiary-level analysis of Japanese multinationals," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(2-3), pages 277-292.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:mgtdec:v:29:y:2008:i:2-3:p:277-292
    DOI: 10.1002/mde.1392
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/mde.1392
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ian Domowitz & R. Glenn Hubbard & Bruce C. Petersen, 1986. "Business Cycles and the Relationship Between Concentration and Price-Cost Margins," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 17(1), pages 1-17, Spring.
    2. James R. Markusen, 2004. "Multinational Firms and the Theory of International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262633078, January.
    3. Walter Kuemmerle, 1999. "The Drivers of Foreign Direct Investment into Research and Development: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 30(1), pages 1-24, March.
    4. Williamson, Oliver E, 1979. "Transaction-Cost Economics: The Governance of Contractural Relations," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(2), pages 233-261, October.
    5. Caves, Richard E, 1971. "International Corporations: The Industrial Economics of Foreign Investment," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 38(149), pages 1-27, February.
    6. L. Wade, 1988. "Review," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 99-100, July.
    7. Machin, Stephen & Van Reenen, John, 1993. "Profit Margins and the Business Cycle: Evidence from UK Manufacturing Firms," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(1), pages 29-50, March.
    8. Schmalensee, Richard, 1985. "Do Markets Differ Much?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 341-351, June.
    9. Ingemar Dierickx & Karel Cool, 1989. "Asset Stock Accumulation and Sustainability of Competitive Advantage," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 35(12), pages 1504-1511, December.
    10. Donald J Lecraw, 1983. "Performance of Transnational Corporations in Less Developed Countries," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 14(1), pages 15-33, March.
    11. Banri Asanuma, 1985. "The Contractual Framework for Parts Supply in the Japanese Automotive Industry," Japanese Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 54-78.
    12. Lall, Sanjaya, 1978. "The Pattern of Intra-Firm Exports by U.S. Multinationals," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 40(3), pages 209-222, August.
    13. R. E. Caves & B. T. Gale & M. E. Porter, 1977. "Interfirm Profitability Differences: Comment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 91(4), pages 667-675.
    14. Berry, Heather & Sakakibara, Mariko, 2008. "Resource accumulation and overseas expansion by Japanese multinationals," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 277-302, February.
    15. Andersson, Thomas & Fredriksson, Torbjorn, 2000. "Distinction between intermediate and finished products in intra-firm trade," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 773-792, July.
    16. Jay B. Barney, 1986. "Strategic Factor Markets: Expectations, Luck, and Business Strategy," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 32(10), pages 1231-1241, October.
    17. Kogut, Bruce & Chang, Sea Jin, 1996. "Platform Investments and Volatility Exchange Rates: Direct Investment in the U.S. by Japanese Electronic Companies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(2), pages 221-231, May.
    18. Hackett, Steven C. & Srinivasan, Krishna, 1998. "Do supplier switching costs differ across Japanese and US multinational firms?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 13-32, January.
    19. Richard B. Mancke, 1974. "Causes of Interfirm Profitability Differences: A New Interpretation of the Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 88(2), pages 181-193.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Trąpczyński, Piotr & Banalieva, Elitsa R., 2016. "Institutional difference, organizational experience, and foreign affiliate performance: Evidence from Polish firms," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 826-842.
    2. HOSONO Kaoru & MIYAKAWA Daisuke & TAKIZAWA Miho, 2017. "Do Overseas Subsidiaries Benefit from Parent Firms' Intangibles?," Discussion papers 17073, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:mgtdec:v:29:y:2008:i:2-3:p:277-292. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/7976 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.