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State income taxation with mobile labor

Author

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  • David E. Wildasin

    (Department of Economics, Indiana University)

Abstract

The ability of state and local governments to use tax and other fiscal policies to redistribute income may be limited when labor is mobile. An analysis of the allocative and distributional effects of a state income tax shows that, by driving out taxed households, the burden of the tax may be shifted to immobile households and other owners of immobile factors of production and may impose an excess burden on them. The NBER TAXSIM model is used to calculate state income tax burdens for representative high-income households in 1986-1988. Further calculations based on assumed demand elasticities for labor indicate that if high-income households are mobile, the marginal excess burden of income taxes imposed on them may be of substantial size in certain states, especially among the highest income groups.

Suggested Citation

  • David E. Wildasin, 1993. "State income taxation with mobile labor," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(1), pages 51-75.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:12:y:1993:i:1:p:51-75
    DOI: 10.2307/3325459
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert J. LaLonde & Robert H. Topel, 1991. "Labor Market Adjustments to Increased Immigration," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market, pages 167-199 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Bradford, David F., 1978. "Factor prices may be constant but factor returns are not," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 199-203.
    3. Greenwood, Michael J & McDowell, John M, 1986. "The Factor Market Consequences of U.S. Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(4), pages 1738-1772, December.
    4. Wildasin, David E, 1991. "Income Redistribution in a Common Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 757-774, September.
    5. Fullerton, Don, 1991. "Reconciling Recent Estimates of the Marginal Welfare Cost of Taxation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 302-308, March.
    6. Topel, Robert H, 1986. "Local Labor Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages 111-143, June.
    7. Alice M. Rivlin, 1991. "Distinguished Lecture on Economics in Government: Strengthening the Economy by Rethinking the Role of Federal and State Governments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 3-14, Spring.
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    Cited by:

    1. David E. Wildasin, 2000. "Factor mobility and fiscal policy in the EU: policy issues and analytical approaches," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 15(31), pages 337-378, October.
    2. Jeffrey Thompson, 2011. "Costly Migration and the Incidence of State and Local Taxes," Working Papers wp251, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    3. Parviainen, Seija, 1998. "Redistribution and Risk Sharing in EMU," Discussion Papers 159, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Eric Smith & Tracy Webb, 2001. "Tax Competition, Income Differentials and Local Public Services," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 8(5), pages 675-691, November.
    5. Raquel Fernandez & Richard Rogerson, 1993. "Zoning and the Political Economy of Local Redistribution," NBER Working Papers 4456, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Young, Cristobal & Varner, Charles, 2011. "Millionaire Migration and State Taxation of Top Incomes: Evidence From a Natural Experiment," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 64(2), pages 255-283, June.

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