IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/jmoncb/v50y2018i8p1901-1933.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Credit Default Swaps in General Equilibrium: Endogenous Default and Credit‐Spread Spillovers

Author

Listed:
  • R. MATTHEW DARST
  • EHRAZ REFAYET

Abstract

This paper shows that credit default swaps (CDS) can affect the type of debt firms issue. Firms face a trade‐off between investment scale and the cost of capital measured by the credit spread. Small‐scale investment is safe, fully collateralized, but earns modest profits in all states. Large‐scale investment is risky, requires a positive credit spread, but yields high profits only in good states and default in bad states. CDS only affect risky credit spreads, which in turn affects the opportunity cost of issuing collateralized, safe debt. Covered (Naked) CDS lower (raise) credit spreads and raise (lower) the likelihood of issuing risky debt. Finally, we show that CDS generate credit spread and investment spillovers for non‐CDS‐referenced firms.

Suggested Citation

  • R. Matthew Darst & Ehraz Refayet, 2018. "Credit Default Swaps in General Equilibrium: Endogenous Default and Credit‐Spread Spillovers," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(8), pages 1901-1933, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jmoncb:v:50:y:2018:i:8:p:1901-1933
    DOI: 10.1111/jmcb.12507
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/jmcb.12507
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos, 2012. "Leverage and Default in Binomial Economies: A Complete Characterization," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1877RRR, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Mar 2015.
    2. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos, 2012. "Tranching, CDS, and Asset Prices: How Financial Innovation Can Cause Bubbles and Crashes," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 190-225, January.
    3. Banerjee, Snehal & Graveline, Jeremy J., 2014. "Trading in derivatives when the underlying is scarce," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(3), pages 589-608.
    4. Parlour, Christine A. & Winton, Andrew, 2013. "Laying off credit risk: Loan sales versus credit default swaps," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(1), pages 25-45.
    5. Oehmke, Martin & Zawadowski, Adam, 2015. "Synthetic or real? The equilibrium effects of credit default swaps on bond markets," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 84511, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Acharya, Viral V. & Johnson, Timothy C., 2007. "Insider trading in credit derivatives," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 110-141, April.
    7. Alan D. Morrison, 2005. "Credit Derivatives, Disintermediation, and Investment Decisions," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 78(2), pages 621-648, March.
    8. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos, 2012. "Leverage and Default in Binomial Economies: A Complete Characterization," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1877R3, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Mar 2015.
    9. Caglio, Cecilia & Darst, R. Matthew & Parolin, Eric, 2019. "Half-full or half-empty? Financial institutions, CDS use, and corporate credit risk," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 40(C).
    10. Marti G. Subrahmanyam & Dragon Yongjun Tang & Sarah Qian Wang, 2014. "Does the Tail Wag the Dog?: The Effect of Credit Default Swaps on Credit Risk," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 27(10), pages 2927-2960.
    11. Patrick Bolton & Martin Oehmke, 2011. "Credit Default Swaps and the Empty Creditor Problem," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(8), pages 2617-2655.
    12. Ana Fostel & John Geanakoplos, 2015. "Leverage and Default in Binomial Economies: A Complete Characterization," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 83, pages 2191-2229, November.
    13. Martin Oehmke & Adam Zawadowski, 2015. "Synthetic or Real? The Equilibrium Effects of Credit Default Swaps on Bond Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 28(12), pages 3303-3337.
    14. Berger, Allen N. & Udell, Gregory F., 1990. "Collateral, loan quality and bank risk," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 21-42, January.
    15. Danis, András & Gamba, Andrea, 2018. "The real effects of credit default swaps," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(1), pages 51-76.
    16. Norden, Lars & Silva Buston, Consuelo & Wagner, Wolf, 2014. "Financial innovation and bank behavior: Evidence from credit markets," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 130-145.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Caglio, Cecilia & Darst, R. Matthew & Parolin, Eric, 2019. "Half-full or half-empty? Financial institutions, CDS use, and corporate credit risk," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 40(C).
    2. Feixue Gong & Gregory Phelan, 2020. "Collateral Constraints, Tranching, and Price Bases," Department of Economics Working Papers 2020-03, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    3. R. Matthew Darst & Ehraz Refayet, 2019. "Mixed Signals: Investment Distortions with Adverse Selection," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-044, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:jmoncb:v:50:y:2018:i:8:p:1901-1933. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-2879 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.