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Gender, heroin consumption and economic behaviour

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  • Anne Line Bretteville-Jensen

    (SIFA, Oslo, Norway)

Abstract

The study examines differences in consumption and economic behaviour among male and female heroin users. A sample of heroin injectors (n=1834) was interviewed near the needle-exchange service in Oslo and information on consumption, prices, and income was recorded. The consumption pattern of the heroin addicts varies by gender, with females consuming relatively less alcohol and cannabis but significantly more heroin than their male counterparts. The finding of greater heroin consumption among women is surprising. By means of a switching regression model, price and income elasticities for heroin are estimated. Women appear to be more responsive than men to changes in prices. However, the elasticities also differ substantially by dealing status, and non-dealers are more price-responsive than dealers. Non-dealing males emerge with a higher income elasticity compared with their female counterparts, whereas female dealers seem to respond more to changes in income than do male dealers. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Line Bretteville-Jensen, 1999. "Gender, heroin consumption and economic behaviour," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(5), pages 379-389.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:8:y:1999:i:5:p:379-389
    DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1099-1050(199908)8:5<379::AID-HEC458>3.0.CO;2-J
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    2. Grossman, Michael & Chaloupka, Frank J., 1998. "The demand for cocaine by young adults: a rational addiction approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 427-474, August.
    3. Silverman, Lester P. & Spruill, Nancy L., 1977. "Urban crime and the price of heroin," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 80-103, January.
    4. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M, 1988. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 675-700, August.
    5. Godfrey, L. G. & Hutton, J. P., 1994. "Discriminating between errors-in- variables/simultaneity and misspecification in linear regression models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 359-364, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bretteville-Jensen, Anne-Line & Biørn, Erik, 2002. "Drug Injection, Drug Dealing, And The Influence Of Economic Factors: A Two-Drug Micro-Econometric Analysis," Working Papers in Economics 11/02, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    2. Anne Bretteville-Jensen, 2006. "Drug Demand – Initiation, Continuation and Quitting," De Economist, Springer, vol. 154(4), pages 491-516, December.
    3. Carlos Casacuberta & Mariana Gerstenblüth & Patricia Triunfo, 2012. "Aportes del análisis económico al estudio de las drogas," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0112, Department of Economics - dECON.
    4. Bretteville-Jensen,A.L. & Biorn,E., 2001. "Estimating addicts' price response of heroin : a panel data approach based on a re-interviewed sample," Memorandum 08/2001, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    5. Jeff DeSimone, 2005. "Needle exchange programs and drug injection behavior," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(3), pages 559-577.
    6. Jeff DeSimone, 2002. "Determinants of Drug Injection Behavior: Economic Factors, HIV Injection Risk and Needle Exchange Programs," NBER Working Papers 9350, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General

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