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Access to health care resources in the UK: the case of care for arthritis

Author

Listed:
  • Carol Propper
  • Jenny Eachus

    (Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK)

  • Philip Chan

    (Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK)

  • Nicky Pearson

    (Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK)

  • George Davey Smith

    (Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK)

Abstract

The paper uses new and detailed data from a population sample of individuals with arthritis to examine the impact of objective measures of need for treatment and individual measures of socio-economic position on the distribution of public and private health care. The quality of the data and the range of explanatory factors are more detailed than previously used to study of the allocation of NHS care. The results indicate that broadly the NHS appears to meet its equity goal of equal care for equal medical need, though there is evidence that education increases the amount of resources received. The results also show the importance of the interaction between the public and private sectors in the UK. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Carol Propper & Jenny Eachus & Philip Chan & Nicky Pearson & George Davey Smith, 2005. "Access to health care resources in the UK: the case of care for arthritis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(4), pages 391-406.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:14:y:2005:i:4:p:391-406
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.978
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Carlsen, Fredrik & Kaarboe, Oddvar Martin, 2015. "The relationship between educational attainment and waiting time among the elderly in Norway," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(11), pages 1450-1458.
    2. Richard Cookson & Mauro Laudicella & Paolo Li Donni, 2011. "Measuring change in health care equity using small area administrative data – evidence from the English NHS 2001-8," Working Papers 067cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    3. Cookson, Richard & Laudicella, Mauro & Donni, Paolo Li, 2012. "Measuring change in health care equity using small-area administrative data – Evidence from the English NHS 2001–2008," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(8), pages 1514-1522.
    4. Ralf Dewenter & Thomas Jaschinski & Björn A. Kuchinke, 2013. "Hospital Market Concentration and Discrimination of Patients," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 133(3), pages 345-374.
    5. Jones, A.M, 2010. "Models For Health Care," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/01, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Ignacio Abásolo & Miguel Negrín-Hernández & Jaime Pinilla, 2014. "Equity in specialist waiting times by socioeconomic groups: evidence from Spain," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(3), pages 323-334, April.
    7. Ignacio Abásolo & Jaime Pinilla & Miguel Negrín, 2008. "Equity in the utilization of public health care services by regions in Spain: a multinivel analysis," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 187(4), pages 87-106, December.
    8. Luigi Siciliani & Rossella Verzulli, 2009. "Waiting times and socioeconomic status among elderly Europeans: evidence from SHARE," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(11), pages 1295-1306.

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