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Overcoming informal trade barriers among Japanese intermediaries: An attitudinal assessment

  • Kenneth C. Gehrt

    (Marketing Department, College of Business, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192-0069)

  • Sherry Lotz

    (P.O. Box 210033, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0033)

  • Soyeon Shim

    (P.O. Box 210033, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0033)

  • Tomoaki Sakano

    (School of Commerce, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishi-Waseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan 169-8050)

  • Naoto Onzo

    (School of Commerce, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishi-Waseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan 169-8050)

Registered author(s):

    Access to foreign markets is increasingly critical to the U.S. as global competition increases. Past efforts by the U.S. to penetrate the Japanese market have often focused on overcoming formal trade barriers including tariffs, quotas, and product standards. Although this form of intervention has enjoyed success, limited effort has been devoted to analyzing informal trade barriers. This study examines informal trade barriers in terms of the attitudes of Japanese distributors toward U.S. products. The study focuses on a product-market for which Japan is the leading single-country importer for the U.S.: fruit. Recent inroads into the Japanese market by other countries have eroded the position of the U.S. This erosion will continue unless U.S. exporters can develop appropriate strategies based on sound market intelligence. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Agribusiness 21: 53-63, 2005.

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    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Agribusiness.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 53-63

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:21:y:2005:i:1:p:53-63
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    1. Shimp, Terence A & Kavas, Alican, 1984. " The Theory of Reasoned Action Applied to Coupon Usage," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(3), pages 795-809, December.
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